1. Post #1
    SK17a
    garychencool's Avatar
    October 2010
    12,098 Posts
    OTTAWA — There are no computers at the Ottawa Waldorf School. No iPads, interactive whiteboards or flat-screen televisions either. Headphone wires don’t dangle from ears and pockets aren’t stuffed with smartphones. Students here don’t even have calculators.

    The only apples and blackberries used at this small private school are baked into pies that are cut into pieces as part of a lesson on fractions.

    As public schools race to equip classrooms with the latest in technological gadgetry, teachers of the century-old Waldorf model take a different approach. Here, technology is seen as a distraction — something that gets in the way of creativity and saps attention spans. The focus here is on human interaction and on equipping students with analytical and imaginative skills by using basic tools, such as pencils, pens and knitting needles.

    It’s an approach teachers, parents — and yes, even teenagers — seem to appreciate.

    “Computers do have their place in school, but at the right time, and for us that would be from (age) 14 to 21,” says Alan Krueger, who teaches at the small Stittsville school.

    The Waldorf model is the brainchild of Rudolf Steiner, an Austrian philosopher who founded his first independent school in 1919. It was built to educate the children of employees of the Waldorf-Astoria cigarette factory in Stuttgart, Germany, and followed Steiner’s particular view of educational development.

    He believed there are three phases of a child’s development and created a curriculum to match. The first stage, from birth to age seven, focuses on physical development; the second, from age 7 to 14, on emotional development; and the third, from 14 to 21, on intellectual development.

    Introducing students to computers as an educational tool in the first or second stages, when they may not have fully developed the physical and emotional aspects of their personality, could impede the healthy development of a child’s intellectual side, Krueger explains.

    Computers are also guilty of providing what he calls “dead material” and often make it too easy for people to find the answer.

    “It takes two or three clicks sometimes and I’m given an answer,” he says. “Don’t people make bigger gains when they have to, out of their own will, their own fortitude, their own creativity, come to the solution themselves?

    “Plants grow better if you give them time to grow and nourish them and we’re trying to do the same thing.”

    A walk around the school offers a glimpse of this nourishment in action.

    In Juanita Stein’s Grade 2 and 3 class, where the desks have been pushed aside to create an open space on the floor, students are given several blue cards that each contain a letter of the alphabet. Quietly, the students work together to put the letters in order from A to Z.

    Across the hall, the students in Deborah Wilkins’ Grade 4 and 5 class stand in a circle and pass beanbags to each other following a set pattern. Wilkins adds beanbags one at a time, gently upping the ante. The exercise teaches students to co-operate and also trains their eyes to follow the beanbag, which is helpful for improving reading skills.

    The Grade 6 and 7 students are having a music lesson. They each play a recorder, which they store in colourful sacks they knit for themselves when they were six years old

    And in Krueger’s Grade 8 class, it’s time for a geography lesson, with the class drawing a map of Canada by hand and locating the major bodies of water.

    The students create their own elaborate textbooks, where each keeps notes, makes illustrations and compiles all subjects into one place.

    Teachers also combine mental and physical tasks, such as saying multiplication tables out loud while skipping, and encourage students to eat their way through fractions. The students cut up fruit into pieces — halves, quarters, eighths and so on — and then, as a class, bake pies, which are also cut up into fractions.

    Feed your brain, and then some.

    ***

    Logan Aylesworth used to go to a Catholic school in his Barrhaven neighbourhood. But he ran into a variety of troubles there, namely bullying and teasing. A teacher flagged him as perhaps having some behavioural issues, so his parents had the young boy assessed. There was nothing diagnosable.

    “Then we started considering, well, maybe if there’s nothing wrong with him, maybe there’s something wrong with the environment he’s in,” says Logan’s father, Jason.

    He and his wife explored several private schools before settling on Waldorf, which Aylesworth says aligns with the family’s values.

    “We’ve never exposed our kids to a lot of television. It was just something we didn’t think was that important or that good for them and then we found a school that shared that same philosophy.”

    The same goes for other types of technology commonly used in many classrooms today.

    “At the old school, they were trying to bring in Smart Boards. That was the big thing they were pushing the year we left, and we’d never understood what the purpose was,” Aylesworth says. “How can they teach better than a teacher with physical, tactile things?”

    It’s not so much that the technology is bad, but rather that traditional, hands-on techniques are better, he says.

    Krueger agrees that interactive whiteboards, among other things, risk interrupting a child’s imagination. If, for example, he is telling his class a story about a blacksmith, every student conjures in their own mind what a blacksmith looks like based on what they have read or learned previously.

    But if Krueger had a Smart Board, he’d simply click on a link and every student would look at the same picture of a blacksmith. No imagination needed.

    “We’re trying to promote lifelong learning to continue to foster their innate curiosity,” he says.

    Grade 8 student Nora Joyner came to the Waldorf school last year after several years at a Kanata public school.

    Had her family lived closer at the time, they would have sent Nora and her younger sister to the school from the beginning, says her father, Allan Joyner.

    He likes the smaller classes, the non-competitive atmosphere and the understated, non-denominational focus on students’ spiritual side.

    And he welcomes the absence of technology, saying his daughters aren’t missing out.

    “A lot of what amounted to research (at the old school) was copy/paste, copy/paste, Google/copy/paste,” he says. “To me, that’s not research.

    “They weren’t learning any computer skills at the other schools. They just had (computers) and I think they had them much too much and a lot of times in unsupervised ways.”

    Adds Aylesworth: “Most technology these days is designed for my mom to use. If my mom can learn it, a kid can pick it up, whether it’s at five or eight or 13. They’ll pick it up very quickly whenever they get exposed to it, so waiting a few years, I don’t think, harms them in the least, and it broadens their experiences beyond that so they’re not dependent on it.”

    It’s worth noting neither men are technophobes. In fact, they both work closely with computers every day — Joyner as a video producer, Aylesworth a software developer. But their opinions about computers in the classroom appear to be shared by others in the high-tech sector. Employees of Silicon Valley giants eBay, Google and Apple all send their children to Waldorf schools.

    “I would hope my kids will go into the high-tech sector eventually as adults,” Aylesworth says. “That would be a career I’d fully endorse, but there’s no hurry to learn that stuff.”

    ***

    There are those who would roll their eyes at the Waldorf model, who would find all those wooden desks, handmade dolls and No. 2 pencils desperately antiquated. Those who would fret if their child couldn’t read by the time he or she entered the first grade.

    Even Joyner, who now wishes there was a Waldorf high school in Ottawa, wasn’t initially sold on the notion. “I found the initial backwardness appearance of it a little off-putting,” he says. “It looked like a 1930s classroom. There’s no computers, everything is done by hand, there’s no pop culture anywhere to be seen in the place. It just looks different.”

    Nowhere is that difference more pronounced than in the total absence of technology.

    Ron Lancaster, a senior lecturer at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, has mixed feelings about the tech-free approach.

    “It makes me sad to think that there’s some students not getting some of these things, but on other hand, maybe they’re getting something that’s just as good,” he says.

    Lancaster, whose research interests include hand-held technologies and the role they play in the classroom, believes everyone can benefit from a little bit of technology.

    “I’d actually argue all students (benefit) because you can really present things in ways that would be very difficult on paper and you can also let students be interactive with it, and that’s the one thing that I’d be a little worried about with a school like this unless they’re doing things that gets the same result overall.”

    Lancaster hasn’t visited a Waldorf school, but says he’s generally impressed by what he’s read or heard about the model.

    Although he’s pro-technology, it remains unclear even to him how its use in schools will play out in the long run.

    “Even though there may be some fabulous benefits from the use of technology, if, in the end, you have students who can’t sit still for five minutes because they’re texting all the time, are we ahead or would it better to do what they’ve done at the Waldorf school?”

    ***

    All seven students in Krueger’s Grade 8 class have a computer at home and most use it daily.

    But here in their classroom, there’s not a screen in sight.

    “I don’t really see any reason for them,” says Bridget Whitlock, 14. “We’ve done fine without them so far.”

    “We do a lot more hands-on work than you would in other classrooms,” adds classmate Nora Joyner.

    Unlike the others, Nora spent years in a public school and has a basis for comparison. The lack of computers in the school, for her, has had at least one side effect: “My handwriting’s improved,” she says.

    Bridget, Nora and the rest of the class are off to high school in September. They don’t appear to be any more nervous than a typical teen making the same transition and, after getting a glimpse earlier this year at a Grade 9 math textbook, they’re not too worried about being behind their public school-educated peers.

    Still, it’s hard to say if the Waldorf model produces better results because the schools aren’t results-based, meaning there are no standardized tests or other benchmarks to use for comparison.

    And it doesn’t come cheap. Annual tuition at the Ottawa school is $9,746 (there’s a sliding scale for families with two or more children attending).

    The Association of Waldorf Schools of North America, which accredits the continent’s 160 schools and 250 early childhood centres, boasts that in its own survey of graduates 94 per cent attended college or university, with a near-even split between those in arts and humanities and those in math or science.

    But Krueger, who has taught the same group of students since most were in Grade 2, has his own benchmark. He says he’s pleased when former students get to high school and pose thoughtful, probing questions to their teachers; when they are more focused on learning for learning’s sake than acing exams.

    “I’ve heard some of my students grumble about that,” he says. “They say, ‘Mr. Krueger, why can’t we just explore something and not have to worry about the test at the end?’”

    “I am happy when I hear they score A’s or win a number of awards, but that’s not my goal.”
    Formatted by Kabstrac, I couldn't edit/fix this earlier because I wasn't on. Sorry about that.

    Source

    Well damn, this school doesn't even have calculators!
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  2. Post #2
    Gold Member

    May 2007
    991 Posts
    I didn't read the whole thing due to massive paragraph. Though I quite agree that kids should learn with out tech in school.
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  3. Post #3
    I once watched a girl get eaten by a horse and it was bad
    Dead Madman's Avatar
    December 2008
    5,454 Posts
    I know it's hard to, but I agree with them.
    I my self am waaay too distracted to my PC and I never focus on school shit.
    I really enjoy my time on my PC, but I really wish I wasn't so addicted to it. I'm doing pretty awful at school at the moment.
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  4. Post #4
    Gold Member
    chunkymonkey's Avatar
    January 2005
    18,413 Posts
    Source

    Well damn, this school doesn't even have calculators!
    You know what would be nice? Some formatting!
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  5. Post #5
    Gold Member
    darkrei9n's Avatar
    November 2007
    4,846 Posts
    I can agree with them. Schools do not develop your mind. They only force you to work through problems and try to get you to memorize things. That isn't teaching, its more like factory work. Just push the students through these steps and when they graduate they're done, send them off. It just doesn't work.

    Technology only helps to distract students because schools don't really have a goal. You're only goal is to graduate, not learn. You want to get out of there because you aren't really doing anything other than memorization or going through the motions of something. When you add cell phones or technology in general it distracts students and they aren't even doing that even more.
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  6. Post #6
    Gold Member
    Cushie's Avatar
    February 2005
    2,196 Posts
    I can agree with them. Schools do not develop your mind. They only force you to work through problems and try to get you to memorize things. That isn't teaching, its more like factory work. Just push the students through these steps and when they graduate they're done, send them off. It just doesn't work.
    This is pretty much my issue with school summed up, not sure about other countries but definitely in the UK.

    School is pretty much a memory game; you arent taught to think for yourself or develop your own interests and ideas. You are taught to remember X, Y and Z so you can spit it up on an exam and get a certificate, even though when you get a job you will most likely have to look up most of the stuff that you forgot.

    While there should be some sort of basic skills taught (Maths, language, basic science etc), we are going the wrong way about teaching kids up to their high school exams.
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  7. Post #7
    Gold Member
    viperfan7's Avatar
    November 2007
    3,498 Posts
    what about those of us with learning disabilities who require the use of a computer, I have incredible difficulty writing things down to paper and if I didn't have a laptop to do my work on I would be unable to get the work done

    although I do agree, the way we schools teach students currently is just memorization, and that needs to change

    in fact, it would be illegal for them to do this if someone with an IEP which states that they must have access to a computer goes to that school, unless that applies only to public schools, but I doubt that
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  8. Post #8
    Kabstrac's Avatar
    April 2012
    3,186 Posts
    SNIP, Op finally fixed his post


    Formatted if anyone wants to read it.
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  9. Post #9
    Gold Member
    Clavus's Avatar
    September 2009
    5,735 Posts
    Computers distract because teaching is behind the times. Learning still has to completely haul itself into the new age, and by that I don't mean just a few computer related classes. Nowadays it's a more useful skill to be able to find information you need, rather than memorizing it.
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  10. Post #10
    I once worked at a sperm bank, the food was terrible
    The Baconator's Avatar
    April 2011
    8,942 Posts
    I didn't read the whole thing due to massive paragraph. Though I quite agree that kids should learn with out tech in school.
    No I think digital over endless, loseable papers is better. I hate have to lug around binders and all the shit that comes with it.
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  11. Post #11
    Gold Member
    sHiBaN's Avatar
    April 2006
    3,994 Posts
    Personally, I can see a future where tech usage is a standard in school.

    I don't think they're a distraction, the exact opposite to me. They greatly aid students in ways a simple teacher and whiteboard can not offer. What would we do without PowerPoint presentations? My college heavily relies on the usage of a class website for discussions and topics.

    The only distraction in terms of "tech" (which is pretty broad here) would be cell phones really. Personal technology not associated with the school or teachings. Otherwise it would be a welcomed addition
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  12. Post #12
    Fuck that and everyone who agrees. I love my tech at school. It makes life so much easier. Taking notes, doing formulas and all other shit. I am glad I was born in a world where you get to use such great devices like notebooks, smartphones, projectors and all kind of other tech.
    It's distracting not because of tech but because school is boring as shit. If people won't text on their phones, they will sleep. No difference.
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  13. Post #13
    Gold Member
    carcarcargo's Avatar
    October 2007
    14,157 Posts
    Education needs to be more based around longer courseworks about getting information on a subject and putting it into a case study kind of thing rather than just memorising facts which really just tests a students memory and writing speed rather than their understanding of the subject. Of course this doesn't work in all subjects like maths and certain sciences, but I think in humanities subjects things should be more coursework based.

  14. Post #14
    Gold Member
    Electrocuter's Avatar
    December 2005
    5,632 Posts
    I can agree with them. Schools do not develop your mind. They only force you to work through problems and try to get you to memorize things. That isn't teaching, its more like factory work. Just push the students through these steps and when they graduate they're done, send them off. It just doesn't work.

    Technology only helps to distract students because schools don't really have a goal. You're only goal is to graduate, not learn. You want to get out of there because you aren't really doing anything other than memorization or going through the motions of something. When you add cell phones or technology in general it distracts students and they aren't even doing that even more.
    That's the schools problem for being boring, not technology. Without technology they'll just go back to scribbling on the paper and throwing paper balls, it won't fix anything.
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  15. Post #15
    Acesarge's Avatar
    March 2010
    1,157 Posts
    I disagree with this. My disaster operations professor encourages us to use our phones/laptops to look up things related to what we are discussing in class. It helps keep the students engaged and we learn things we otherwise wouldn't.
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  16. Post #16
    Gold Member
    Sector 7's Avatar
    May 2005
    3,073 Posts
    whenever I was in a class with computers I spent most of my time playing Dwarf Fortress and Tetris.
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  17. Post #17
    1STrandomman's Avatar
    May 2007
    1,959 Posts
    I think they have certain things right in their philosophy, mainly that fostering an interest in learning is more important than rote memorization. However, I don't think that the lack of technology has anything to do with that.
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  18. Post #18
    Gold Member
    Prez's Avatar
    March 2011
    1,479 Posts
    Hm, I had no idea that this school existed. I'm about ten to fifteen minutes from Stittsville too. I don't necessarily agree with them on the issue, but I guess I understand why they have that standpoint.
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  19. Post #19
    The Devourer of Souls
    Rhenae's Avatar
    July 2011
    2,762 Posts
    I can agree with them. Schools do not develop your mind. They only force you to work through problems and try to get you to memorize things. That isn't teaching, its more like factory work. Just push the students through these steps and when they graduate they're done, send them off. It just doesn't work.

    Technology only helps to distract students because schools don't really have a goal. You're only goal is to graduate, not learn. You want to get out of there because you aren't really doing anything other than memorization or going through the motions of something. When you add cell phones or technology in general it distracts students and they aren't even doing that even more.
    So really then the problem here is not technology per se, but rather the fact it is more interesting than school. Because school does not engage students.

  20. Post #20
    Blue Member?
    Ermac20's Avatar
    October 2010
    7,460 Posts
    i can tell this is 100% true phones should just be taken away while learning and given back after
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  21. Post #21
    i can tell this is 100% true phones should just be taken away while learning and given back after
    Ironic because students that use phones are rarely learning even without them.
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  22. Post #22
    SK17a
    garychencool's Avatar
    October 2010
    12,098 Posts
    Everyone's school life has been a crap load easier with tech. Back in the day, we had something called a blackboard where we would have to write the stuff off the board as the teacher wrote it on the board. There was no such a thing as a photocopier (unless the school had the money). There were more complications where technology has made it easier, the photocopier helped, a lot. When I wrote stuff off the board, I felt like I was a mindless zombie, I was just copying whatever was on the board, I didn't even remember/learn what was being written. With a photocopied sheet, I just read it (since it was typed, I can actually read it) and was able to understand it.

    Today, there are smart boards and such, and powerpoint presentations that would be interesting to watch, even YouTube videos that have sped up the learning in general for me and the entire class. In terms of the whole everyone has the technology, not really. I didn't even have a phone until September of 2011. It's Android and can do pretty much everything. I know a lot of people who don't even have a music player of any kind at home, nor a computer. So realistically, not everyone has the tech, nor is it on par with the one's who have the high end material.

    Anyway's since I got my first phone, i made it to good use and I started making notes using an app called EverNote. It was ultimately the perfect note making app to increase my knowledge of the material. Now I still filled out handouts and wrote legible notes, I just used EverNote as a second notebook, as a back up, or an Internet synced cloud service that I can access on the computer, and on the Internet browsers. I was writing the notes twice, that's why I remember so much of the material, and I was typing it in on the phone most of the time since I would spend my actual computer type doing other such work.

    Therefore technology is a very useful learning assistant, you just have to regulate what you do on it, when to use it, and not go off topic and do other stuff on it.

  23. Post #23
    into things like this - if you know what
    Dennab
    December 2011
    4,031 Posts
    The school's main goal should be to make education fun, no wonder people are using their cell phones instead.

  24. Post #24
    Gold Member
    Andokool12's Avatar
    November 2008
    10,444 Posts
    Let's continue using the same methods of teaching as we have since the industrial revolution and pretend we're advancing by throwing in useless technology such as rarely-used smartboards while banning the actual accessible technology all students use rather than adapting for it.

    Seriously yeah not having calculators or computers is awful but regardless, I see little use for iPads and smartboards as they are currently used. Our schoolboard got a shitload of iPads and all I can think is like, why? The money could've gone to much better things, (HURR COULDA GONE TO ANDROID TABLITZ - no.) they are used for things that can already be done and I feel like they're treated as a gimmick more than anything, even the smartboards. At least get a textbook system for the tablets, that would make sense - using them to watch educational vidz is awful considering there's already a projector hooked up to a PC in every class that has done that for years and works fine.

  25. Post #25
    The Union Jack would look a shit ton better with a Hammer and Sickle in the middle of it
    Bobie's Avatar
    November 2007
    7,068 Posts
    I can agree with them. Schools do not develop your mind. They only force you to work through problems and try to get you to memorize things. That isn't teaching, its more like factory work. Just push the students through these steps and when they graduate they're done, send them off. It just doesn't work.

    Technology only helps to distract students because schools don't really have a goal. You're only goal is to graduate, not learn. You want to get out of there because you aren't really doing anything other than memorization or going through the motions of something. When you add cell phones or technology in general it distracts students and they aren't even doing that even more.
    this x infinity

  26. Post #26
    Gold Member
    TestECull's Avatar
    July 2007
    6,517 Posts
    I think it's a bad idea. Technology has the ability to at least in some part restore the school system back to a state that isn't 'fubar'.


    Keeping kids off cell phones is a good idea, I wish you luck on actually doing this, but outright removing tech from the classroom just isn't the way to go.
    I can agree with them. Schools do not develop your mind. They only force you to work through problems and try to get you to memorize things. That isn't teaching, its more like factory work. Just push the students through these steps and when they graduate they're done, send them off. It just doesn't work.
    Technology in the classroom can get around that. Technology can get kids interested, technology can get them to think for themselves, technology can teach them what they need to be learning instead of what they're expected to be learning.

  27. Post #27
    Gold Member
    Cushie's Avatar
    February 2005
    2,196 Posts
    Back in the day, we had something called a blackboard where we would have to write the stuff off the board as the teacher wrote it on the board. There was no such a thing as a photocopier (unless the school had the money). There were more complications where technology has made it easier, the photocopier helped, a lot. When I wrote stuff off the board, I felt like I was a mindless zombie, I was just copying whatever was on the board, I didn't even remember/learn what was being written. With a photocopied sheet, I just read it (since it was typed, I can actually read it) and was able to understand it.
    Sorry, but arent you like 15? I'm 5 years older than you and even we had whiteboards, photocopiers etc when I was 13 and my school wasnt even that great.

    Besides that, yeah, technology makes life easier if used properly, but the second you add any features past that people will just start being distracted by them. Just look at ICT lessons in high school, the work is so mind numbingly boring and playing flash games is much more fun, yet when I moved on to do computing and programming you'd find that the work was a lot more engaging and everyone would actually be sitting doing work rather than distracting themselves with games.

    The point still stands that the reason technology is distracting in schools, is that school work is just not engaging at all.

  28. Post #28
    Gold Member
    Meller Yeller's Avatar
    June 2010
    10,243 Posts
    I didn't read the whole thing due to massive paragraph. Though I quite agree that kids should learn with out tech in school.
    School is meant to prepare children for the real world and if you don't expose them to technology then you are failing at that since we live in the digital age.

  29. Post #29
    SK17a
    garychencool's Avatar
    October 2010
    12,098 Posts
    Sorry, but arent you like 15? I'm 5 years older than you and even we had whiteboards, photocopiers etc when I was 13 and my school wasnt even that great.

    Besides that, yeah, technology makes life easier if used properly, but the second you add any features past that people will just start being distracted by them. Just look at ICT lessons in high school, the work is so mind numbingly boring and playing flash games is much more fun.

    The point still stands that the reason technology is distracting in schools, is that school work is just not engaging at all.
    I was referring to the 1900s and the learning environment as most people don't know that.

    I still agree with the point that technology can be distracting in schools, I always feel tempted to just ditch the ICS work and go on reddit instead. I still find ICS interesting as I'm pretty much getting perfect in it.

  30. Post #30
    DID I MENTION I PLAY BANJO
    Hardpoint Nomad's Avatar
    July 2010
    7,490 Posts
    Secret inside look at the typical school in Ottawa


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  31. Post #31
    Is this an elementary school or a middle school?

    I can understand the rationale, but if they're teaching trig without calculators then the world has gone mad.

  32. Post #32
    Secret inside look at the typical school in Ottawa


    Dude you can't trick me. That's fake.

    I see the flatscreen TV in the background.
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  33. Post #33
    Gold Member
    VistaPOWA's Avatar
    October 2008
    8,370 Posts
    Is this an elementary school or a middle school?

    I can understand the rationale, but if they're teaching trig without calculators then the world has gone mad.
    It's elementary school.

    Edited:

    I disagree with this. My disaster operations professor encourages us to use our phones/laptops to look up things related to what we are discussing in class. It helps keep the students engaged and we learn things we otherwise wouldn't.
    You can't compare universities with elementary schools.

  34. Post #34
    They've started handing out laptops to elementary school kids 4th grade and up over here.
    I'm all for technology in classrooms but that can't end good.

  35. Post #35
    Gold Member
    Colliseemoe's Avatar
    December 2009
    810 Posts
    This is pretty much my issue with school summed up, not sure about other countries but definitely in the UK.

    School is pretty much a memory game; you arent taught to think for yourself or develop your own interests and ideas. You are taught to remember X, Y and Z so you can spit it up on an exam and get a certificate, even though when you get a job you will most likely have to look up most of the stuff that you forgot.

    While there should be some sort of basic skills taught (Maths, language, basic science etc), we are going the wrong way about teaching kids up to their high school exams.
    I feel like this is 100% true in the US as well.

    1. Memorize
    2. Take Test
    3. Forget
    4. Repeat

    I barely retain anything I learn in school. I only really remember some things that come up in history that I find interesting.

  36. Post #36
    Gold Member
    sami-pso's Avatar
    June 2006
    4,759 Posts
    Problem with this, in my opinion, is that once they go home they are back to being distracted by the real world. They need to teach using current technology so that people know what to do outside school.
    Plus, 1 out of 10 students has adhd so they will have a hard time focusing on "boring" things. Making it fun to learn is the only way to teach certain people.

  37. Post #37
    SK17a
    garychencool's Avatar
    October 2010
    12,098 Posts
    Learning French in Canada explained:

    Grade 4 : Learn the basics
    Grade 5 : re-Learn what was taught in Grade 4 but with slightly more content
    Grade 6 : re-Learn what was taught in Grade 5 but with slightly more content
    Grade 7 : re-Learn what was taught in Grade 6 but with slightly more content
    Grade 8 : re-Learn what was taught in Grade 7 but with slightly more content
    Grade 9 : re-Learn what was taught in Grade 8 but with slightly more content

    Nothing "new" was learned with French over the years unless you take Grade 10 French which throws a crapload of new content at you.
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  38. Post #38
    Gold Member
    Kinversulath's Avatar
    February 2007
    3,779 Posts
    Secret inside look at the typical school in Ottawa


    As an student in Ottawa, I can confirm this is legit.
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  39. Post #39
    Gold Member
    M2k3's Avatar
    February 2005
    2,092 Posts
    Some of their concepts are interesting, though I can't help but disagree with most of it. My opinion is probably fairly biased though, as I used to build SMART boards and think they can be an excellent teaching asset if used properly. Teachers seem to be afraid to let the children actually use them because they're expensive when really they're built and designed for children to use and abuse them.

    I also can't help but think that not allowing computers in an elementary school is a bad move. My passion for computers started in first grade, when the very first computer I ever used was an Apple II. 15 years later and now I'm a systems admin so go figure.

  40. Post #40
    Gold Member
    KorJax's Avatar
    January 2007
    11,142 Posts
    I don't agree with the idea that Schools shouldn't have technology. The opposite is true, if you deprive a student with technology they will be WORTHLESS in the real world. They are extremely invaluble and important tools to not only soceity but educators, learners, etc.

    However, I do agree with the general tone of the article - technology use when in elementary school needs to be limited. The types of things kids will be learning at that age have no need for technology, and its much more important that they develop a solid "real world" down to earth understanding of things that age, than having technology be some kind of important thing. They even said so in the article, that computers and such are fine for 14+ years of age in schools, but for them and their younger students, they have no place.

    This is something I can agree with, as long as the teachings, methods, and lesson plans they give are "modern" as apposed to making it so you're school is "backwards" technologically AND lesson wise. There's a lot of great ideas coming out of education and what types of learning/teaching are most effective, and what types of lessons are most important for development. For a school to ignore such things is just as foolish as letting elementary kids come into class with iphones and such on.

    Though at the same time, total techonology deprivation isn't ideal I feel. I feel like it was perfect when I was a kid - no cell phones or anything to get in the way, and computers were limited both in when you could use them and how you could use them. We had the tech, but it clearly was more or less an asset rather than a distraction.
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