1. Post #1
    Titlepocalypse 2012 participant
    Zedicus Mann's Avatar
    November 2010
    7,940 Posts
    Problem:
    My computer will not boot up. It just shuts down after so long. How long seems to be dependent on how long since the last time I attempted to start it up, as if it is charging.

    Attempted:
    - One stick of RAM at a time
    - Unplugged all but boot drive
    - Reset CMOS
    - Reset Motherboard settings (when it was able to get there)

    Build:
    ASRock P67 Extreme4 Gen3
    Intel Core i5-2500K Processor
    EVGA GeForce GTA 560 TI Superclocked
    Corsair Enthusiast Series 650-Watt 80 Plus Bronze
    Corsair XMS3 8 GB (2 x 4GB)

  2. Post #2
    Owns a Pet Haggis
    BowedYapper's Avatar
    January 2009
    382 Posts
    So when you say your computer will not boot up, does that mean its just a black screen and nothing happens?

    Would like a little more information to help you a bit :)


    EDIT: Also, if you don't have a speaker connected to your motherboard (the small 4 Pin speaker that plugs in near your Power Switch / Reset Switch) I would suggest connecting it as any beeps from it upon turning on could help you identify any problems, if you do however have it connected and only hear 1 single short beep from it upon power on, then ignore this :)

  3. Post #3
    lady godiva's giant vaginas
    Metalcastr's Avatar
    May 2005
    1,868 Posts
    Perhaps it is overheating. Blast out any dust.

  4. Post #4
    Titlepocalypse 2012 participant
    Zedicus Mann's Avatar
    November 2010
    7,940 Posts
    So when you say your computer will not boot up, does that mean its just a black screen and nothing happens?
    Sometimes it doesn't stay on long enough to even show the motherboard screen on the monitor.
    Other times it's been about to the Windows login screen before it just shut down.

    Also, if you don't have a speaker connected to your motherboard (the small 4 Pin speaker that plugs in near your Power Switch / Reset Switch) I would suggest connecting it as any beeps from it upon turning on could help you identify any problems, if you do however have it connected and only hear 1 single short beep from it upon power on, then ignore this :)
    Currently don't have a speaker connected, but I could borrow my dad's motherboard speaker from his sometime.

  5. Post #5
    Gold Member
    taipan's Avatar
    September 2005
    5,574 Posts
    This sounds like either a crappy PSU or overheating.

    Is the CPU heatsink properly seated?
    And try to see your temperatures in bios if you can get there.

  6. Post #6
    Titlepocalypse 2012 participant
    Zedicus Mann's Avatar
    November 2010
    7,940 Posts
    Also this problem just kind of came out of nowhere. I came home, tried to boot the computer and it was stopping on USB Initialization.
    Then it got into a loop powering up and down after about a second of each and then to where it is now.

  7. Post #7
    lady godiva's giant vaginas
    Metalcastr's Avatar
    May 2005
    1,868 Posts
    Check all cables, but it seems like the power supply has failed. Swap it out with another to see.

  8. Post #8
    Titlepocalypse 2012 participant
    Zedicus Mann's Avatar
    November 2010
    7,940 Posts
    Check all cables, but it seems like the power supply has failed. Swap it out with another to see.
    I don't exactly have an extra power supply sitting around to test it on, but I'll see what I can find.

  9. Post #9
    lady godiva's giant vaginas
    Metalcastr's Avatar
    May 2005
    1,868 Posts
    Borrow your dad's power supply temporarily.
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  10. Post #10
    Titlepocalypse 2012 participant
    Zedicus Mann's Avatar
    November 2010
    7,940 Posts
    Borrow your dad's power supply temporarily.
    Possibly. I don't know how he'll be about that.
    I could also try the old one from my old computer, I guess.

  11. Post #11
    Owns a Pet Haggis
    BowedYapper's Avatar
    January 2009
    382 Posts
    Its a bit strange yes, but it does looks like a PSU which has kicked the bucket, we will not know until you test out another PSU of capable wattage if it is the problem or not.

    Another thing you could do, if you ever manage to get to the BIOS settings screen (very slim chance I'm guessing), is to goto PC Health Status, or an option of that nature to check temperatures, as it could quite possibly be an overheating CPU, for example most motherboards these days have a CPU overheat protection option in the BIOS where upon the CPU reaching a dangerous temperature, it will shut the pc off instantly without warning.

    If the CPU temperature is around 60C (140F) in the BIOS screen, then that should be something to be concerned about, since the CPU is not under much strain, so it should not necessarily get that hot, as taipan already said, you should check if your CPU heatsink is seated correctly, and also see if your thermal compound/paste is not all dried up and useless.

  12. Post #12
    Titlepocalypse 2012 participant
    Zedicus Mann's Avatar
    November 2010
    7,940 Posts
    I disabled the emergency shutdown just to be sure it wasn't that and checked the temperatures.

    CPU: 35C
    MB: 22C

    Not too long after that it shut down, so I guess that wasn't the problem.

  13. Post #13
    Asshole Extraordinaire
    Dennab
    May 2005
    3,705 Posts
    If your PSU warranty has expired, you can open it up and check for signs of damage, which are almost always bulging or leaking capacitors. Just make sure it's been unplugged for about a minute before you open it so the bleeder resistors can do their magic on the line capacitors.

    A quite bad PSU looks something like this:



    The capacitors are the cylinders with the brown electrolyte leaking from the top.
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  14. Post #14
    Naaz's Avatar
    January 2012
    1,692 Posts
    So that's what capacitors look like on the inside!

  15. Post #15
    Owns a Pet Haggis
    BowedYapper's Avatar
    January 2009
    382 Posts
    I disabled the emergency shutdown just to be sure it wasn't that and checked the temperatures.

    CPU: 35C
    MB: 22C

    Not too long after that it shut down, so I guess that wasn't the problem.

    Yes you are absolutely right, no problem there, but referring to bohb's post, it could quite possibly be damaged capacitors but usually (in my own experience) when one becomes damaged, it usually ends up in more than one becoming damaged like a chain reaction, so I am afraid we are stuck at the moment until you are able to try another PSU, however, if you get the same results as before, then it may be possible that you have damaged capacitors on your motherboard (worth checking in my opinion)

  16. Post #16
    chazzball's Avatar
    May 2007
    84 Posts
    My computer had the same problem a while back, i just bought a new power supply and it was instantly fixed

    No problems
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  17. Post #17
    lady godiva's giant vaginas
    Metalcastr's Avatar
    May 2005
    1,868 Posts
    Corsair has a long warranty period see if you can RMA it. I think it's 5 or 7 years.

  18. Post #18
    Titlepocalypse 2012 participant
    Zedicus Mann's Avatar
    November 2010
    7,940 Posts
    Corsair has a long warranty period see if you can RMA it. I think it's 5 or 7 years.
    That's good. I've only had it for a few months.

  19. Post #19
    Asshole Extraordinaire
    Dennab
    May 2005
    3,705 Posts
    it could quite possibly be damaged capacitors but usually (in my own experience) when one becomes damaged, it usually ends up in more than one becoming damaged like a chain reaction
    Capacitors are wired in parallel on each power rail to keep the current level (amperage) flowing through each capacitor below the capacitors' design limits. When one capacitor fails on any given rail, the other capacitors have to pick up the slack and are overloaded. The overloaded caps will then fail along with the original failed capacitor. The time between the failures depends on how heavily loaded the PSU is; If the PSU is only lightly loaded, it can take months or years for the problem to become apparent.

    My computer had the same problem a while back, i just bought a new power supply and it was instantly fixed

    No problems
    Kind of a waste to buy a new PSU when one with failed caps can be fixed for $20 or less and last years more. I've repaired dozens of PSUs and saved quite a bit of coin over buying new PSUs all the time.

  20. Post #20
    audun's Avatar
    January 2012
    223 Posts
    Try jumpstarting your PSU without the motherboard being connected to it.


  21. Post #21
    Asshole Extraordinaire
    Dennab
    May 2005
    3,705 Posts
    Just because a PSU powers up doesn't mean it's good.

  22. Post #22
    Titlepocalypse 2012 participant
    Zedicus Mann's Avatar
    November 2010
    7,940 Posts
    Currently seems to be running fine on my old computer's 550 Watt PSU.
    Guess I'll be contacting Corsair about a replacement PSU then...

    Edited:

    Also apparently my bootloader is on my secondary hard drive. I might need to do something about that later on.

    Edited:

    Windows uptime: 15 minutes and counting
    I guess I should turn it off since it seems to work fine.

  23. Post #23
    Titlepocalypse 2012 participant
    Zedicus Mann's Avatar
    November 2010
    7,940 Posts
    Try jumpstarting your PSU without the motherboard being connected to it.

    It passed that...for about as long as it would have powered my PC.

    Edited:

    Anyway I contacted Corsair. Thanks for the help, everybody.
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