1. Post #41
    While writing itself is completely necessary in today's world, I believe cursive being forced upon people is unnecessary, as it has ruined my handwriting and other's handwriting, not the mention the fact nobody I know even uses it anymore.
    Cursive is nice for signatures and learning the cursive alphabet can help people forge signatures (Whether it is malicious or for a good cause)
    I like cursive and it isn't such a bad thing to be forced to learn in school. If it wasn't for that there would be a whole lot more book reports from my teachers...
    It is kind of like "Why did you learn German? Do you have any intent on going to Germany? No? Then why did you learn it? Know anybody who is German? No? Doing a international job? Oh, you want to be a car salesman your whole life? Okay"

    basically, it's just something nice to know like learning a foreign language when you earn minimum wage and have no intent on travelling the world and at the same time being an introvert.

  2. Post #42
    Gold Member
    Cushie's Avatar
    February 2005
    2,277 Posts
    Notes and handwriting will always have a place in this world, because they are ten times more convenient to scribble down, until we have eye overlays and computers built into us that can do these things for us in an instant.

    I do hate cursive writing though, we were forced to practice it when I was in first school, I went back to my messy non-joined handwriting as soon as we left. I like being able to just scribble something on a bit of paper in seconds and it be nearly unreadable to a lot of people but I can understand it fine since its just how I write.

    I also think writing is an important skill for young people to learn...The process of learning it improves motor skills and precision.

  3. Post #43
    Gold Member
    Big Blue's Avatar
    December 2006
    6,509 Posts
    No I don't believe we really need it anymore. I think it will be entirely replaced by computers someday, even if we aren't around to see it. Computers are simply a superior way of doing things compared to old methods ranging from managing documents, databases, and communication. Signatures may be replaced with fingerprint ID or something similar. There just won't be a need for it anymore further off into the future.

    We might think we need it now because we've grown up with it and are used to it, but one day I'm sure it will be considered entirely obsolete and unnecessary to teach how to write by hand.
    i sincerely hate this mentality

  4. Post #44
    I like the zip of Miracle Whip
    cheetahben's Avatar
    January 2010
    3,989 Posts
    I think computers will be used for writing more (and become a lot more ubiquitous as tools for writing), but I think there will always be a need for handwriting.

    When a doctor fills out a prescription that is specific to a patient, it's more convenient and efficient to jot it down quickly instead of printing it all out into a computer.

    If you need a little reminder throughout your day, put it on a Post-it note, not a little notification on your phone.

    Writing will always be needed in some way, but it will become less common.

  5. Post #45
    Proudly supporting the JIDF
    Dennab
    July 2010
    22,111 Posts
    i sincerely hate this mentality
    What's wrong with it?

  6. Post #46
    DesumThePanda's Avatar
    January 2010
    9,787 Posts
    We still have to sign papers and in areas of lower income we can't afford for everyone to have a computer. Besides, I find it easier to write some things, such as math work, than to type it. I can certainly see something like this in the future but as for now? No.

  7. Post #47
    Gold Member
    The First 11'er's Avatar
    January 2011
    3,723 Posts
    Yes. Signatures keep things unique. If we didn't learn handwriting, font would all just be the same and it'd make things easier to copy. A signature is something you can't just copy.

  8. Post #48
    Fight until death, shoot until empty.

    November 2009
    15,476 Posts
    I am going to say yes. Just because of its redundancy. There is no truth in saying that it is going to be not used. If our 'technology' breaks, all we have left is handwriting.

    I like digital writing better because of its legibility and its easy to translate. I see that my generation (seniors - high school) has began the degrading of handwriting over the course of the years. My school is moving to digital assignments because of budget reasons. However, our handwriting looks like chicken scratch.

  9. Post #49
    dragonkilla's Avatar
    June 2008
    597 Posts
    A pen or pencil and notepad or a sketching pad is a lot less likely to get stolen or taken.
    A tablet or similar would be the first thing a person targets if someone is out drawing something
    And pens and notepads are easier to carry around places.

  10. Post #50
    Gold Member
    Cheshire_cat's Avatar
    September 2006
    3,813 Posts
    Hand writing is definitely needed, as not everyone has a laptop or tablet available at every time of the day. In poorer people and countries, they might have never seen a piece of such technology.

  11. Post #51
    Gold Member
    Big Blue's Avatar
    December 2006
    6,509 Posts
    What's wrong with it?
    it just seems to accept the future as some bleak, emotionless world where computers think for us. losing the skill of writing is just as sad as losing personal expression altogether. there is no beauty in technology, only in the humans that put it there. handwriting is an individual freedom, it's putting your actual voice and personality into words, something incredibly difficult to do with text in my opinion.

  12. Post #52
    Gold Member

    May 2005
    2,268 Posts
    it just seems to accept the future as some bleak, emotionless world where computers think for us. losing the skill of writing is just as sad as losing personal expression altogether. there is no beauty in technology, only in the humans that put it there. handwriting is an individual freedom, it's putting your actual voice and personality into words, something incredibly difficult to do with text in my opinion.
    That's all entirely subjective. Some of us see technology as a great thing, and the fact that we have advanced to this level of efficiency is something to be proud of if you ask me. I also don't agree that handwriting has any sort of special value over typed up text. That's just a social construct we've created and naturally people are going to be afraid of change.

    I really don't think there's anything to be afraid of, and I don't see advanced technology as being "emotionless" or "bleak". I also don't feel that hand writing becoming obsolete would lead to a world where computers think for us. It's just a more efficient way of doing things (for most purposes), that's all it is.

  13. Post #53
    Proudly supporting the JIDF
    Dennab
    July 2010
    22,111 Posts
    it just seems to accept the future as some bleak, emotionless world where computers think for us. losing the skill of writing is just as sad as losing personal expression altogether. there is no beauty in technology, only in the humans that put it there. handwriting is an individual freedom, it's putting your actual voice and personality into words, something incredibly difficult to do with text in my opinion.
    For years people have always said that technology is going to make the world a bleak emotionless place.

    Despite the pace of technological development accelerating, the world is more culturally active than ever before. People listening to music genres that never existed in the 20th century or speaking in languages created last thursday.

    Your view is what helps to slow human progress down, by being fearful of the future and the changes it brings.

  14. Post #54
    1800_SCREWED's Avatar
    February 2012
    80 Posts
    Well i dont think so by writing is just as bad if not worse than your's i NEED to type

  15. Post #55
    pakadots's Avatar
    October 2007
    527 Posts
    Handwriting has a charm about it. And while its possible to forge someone's handwriting, much more effort would have to be put into it opposed to forging a typed letter.

  16. Post #56
    Kefirman's Avatar
    March 2010
    1,034 Posts
    Typing just doesn't feel the same way as handwriting. E-mail,for example doesn't leave that personal imprint which real letter does.

  17. Post #57
    I WOTCH ANIEM
    Maximo13's Avatar
    October 2008
    8,053 Posts
    I don't see why you're saying that cursive isn't needed. I can only write in cursive, we weren't taught how to "print" write.

  18. Post #58
    Streetser20's Avatar
    April 2011
    264 Posts
    I don't think you could abolish hand-writing all together. But it'd be good to have to use it less, due to the paper wastage and resources. But in the short-term at least until someone implements a system that is capable of being as good and secure as hand-writing (e.g. cheques and things could use Biometrics). Then it isn't practical to end hand-writing.

  19. Post #59
    Bat-shit's Avatar
    October 2010
    12,514 Posts
    What the fuck do we have our hands for if not for great things like writing, some artistically precise work, and stuff? Masturbation? Lol

  20. Post #60
    Gold Member
    gamefreek76's Avatar
    October 2005
    7,239 Posts
    Handwriting isn't necessary nearly as much anymore.
    Soon it will become more of an art form than a practical application.

    I think handwriting should still be taught and should always be taught, but typing is definitely an easier way to do the same thing.

  21. Post #61
    Gold Member

    May 2005
    2,268 Posts
    What the fuck do we have our hands for if not for great things like writing, some artistically precise work, and stuff? Masturbation? Lol
    I'm pretty sure that humans are not the only species who have evolved hands

  22. Post #62
    Gold Member
    Number-41's Avatar
    August 2005
    4,292 Posts
    "I can't write cursive so let's just abolish it all-together"

    I don't see how you could take notes in say a math class or anything that requires lots of small specific symbols at a rate you achieve with cursive...

  23. Post #63
    Gold Member
    VistaPOWA's Avatar
    October 2008
    8,370 Posts
    I can only write in cursive. I don't see how can you write faster using printed than cursive letters, which are joined together, are curved (hence cursive) and generally more fit for the human hand.

    Edited:

    Also, jotting down math equations will take a lot of time on a computer if you don't know how to use LaTeX.

  24. Post #64
    Gold Member
    Tools's Avatar
    November 2009
    6,340 Posts
    Today I received a fine for driving my scooter. The reasons given were idiotic but what bothers me the most is I can't even read the officer's handwriting because it's just a big mess.

    And I'm not the only one, nobody I know can read it.

    The important thing about handwriting is if you can't do it properly when doing it stylish then don't do it stylish, I'd rather want something I can read than something that looks good.

  25. Post #65
    Gold Member
    Number-41's Avatar
    August 2005
    4,292 Posts
    I can only write in cursive. I don't see how can you write faster using printed than cursive letters, which are joined together, are curved (hence cursive) and generally more fit for the human hand.

    Edited:

    Also, jotting down math equations will take a lot of time on a computer if you don't know how to use LaTeX.

    Even if you do know it,

    \displaystyle \sum _{i=0} ^N \frac{\partial Q}{\partial x_i}

    isn't faster than



    in handwriting

  26. Post #66
    Torjuz's Avatar
    January 2011
    3,788 Posts
    People still need to sign stuff and by your OWN handwriting, nobody can copy it. A good reason to keep it.

  27. Post #67
    imMonkeyGOD's Avatar
    May 2009
    1,536 Posts
    It sounds really silly to ask if we need handwriting. It's definitely a necessity. Handwriting is almost like someone's identity. They all have their own uniqueness to it and people could identify that it's yours. I'd always prefer reading my own notes on paper than something off a computer honestly.

    What I fear the most is how reliant we are in technology. Using it for practically anything in our daily lives. We store all our documents, music, videos, etc. in one single hard drive that if it were to break, all those files would be lost forever.

  28. Post #68
    Stephen Hawking's Avatar
    October 2011
    18 Posts
    I do hate cursive writing though, we were forced to practice it when I was in first school, I went back to my messy non-joined handwriting as soon as we left.
    I completely agree with you about that. Back when I had to take the ACT test for college, the hardest part for me is where we had to write and sign a contract. In all cursive. I swear it took me an hour to remember. Hahaha.

  29. Post #69
    Gold Member

    May 2005
    2,268 Posts
    What I fear the most is how reliant we are in technology. Using it for practically anything in our daily lives. We store all our documents, music, videos, etc. in one single hard drive that if it were to break, all those files would be lost forever.
    Countless books and historical records have been lost and damaged by fire, aging, and other corruption. It's true that storing your data electronically may also be vulnerable to some corruption, but you have more convenient options (cloud storage, ease of backups) than you do with paper. It's also a good thing that our technology is moving forward, and it's not something to be afraid of, it's something humanity should be proud of. I really think it's ridiculous to be afraid of technological progress which will increase our efficiency exponentially.

  30. Post #70
    Gold Member
    PvtCupcakes's Avatar
    May 2008
    10,900 Posts
    Typing is much better for formal communication.
    Handwriting can be much harder to read, even if it's not sloppy writing. Sometimes people loop their e's like o's, a's, or l's, and I spend more time trying to figure out the letters than reading the text.

    Handwriting is okay for taking notes for your own reading.

    Edited:

    People still need to sign stuff and by your OWN handwriting, nobody can copy it. A good reason to keep it.
    It's easier to forge a handwritten signature than it is to forge a cryptographically secure digital signature.
    Hopefully digital signatures become the norm in the future.

  31. Post #71
    Terminutter's Avatar
    June 2010
    6,202 Posts
    Typing is much better for formal communication.
    Handwriting can be much harder to read, even if it's not sloppy writing. Sometimes people loop their e's like o's, a's, or l's, and I spend more time trying to figure out the letters than reading the text.

    Handwriting is okay for taking notes for your own reading.
    Well done cursive handwriting is a marvel to behold, and is really nice and easy to read. Scrawled, messy, disorganised left-handed cursive (mine) is illegible to any but me. I write faster in cursive than print, so I pretty much go for cursive.

    Learning to write cursive isn't really necessary, but everyone should be able to read it, and everyone should at least be able to print, but typing is the best solution on a day-to-day basis.
    Reading and writing in print should be mandatory, and the ability to read (reasonably neat) cursive should be, too, (though not writing in it) but typing should be the norm outside of maths.

  32. Post #72
    I play the electric violin on desolation row
    Fkpuz Version 1's Avatar
    March 2005
    2,578 Posts
    I think cursive should still be taught, if anything it just makes the brain work in a different way, perhaps in a more creative way when it comes to the technical aspect of writing. It surely doesn't hurt a kid to learn it. However, it shouldn't be mandatory after grade 5.

  33. Post #73
    For 13 years of my life I held a pen funny, so now I can't write proper. I personally think we still should use handwriting. Cursive or not it's still needed.

  34. Post #74
    Even if you do know it,

    \displaystyle \sum _{i=0} ^N \frac{\partial Q}{\partial x_i}

    isn't faster than



    in handwriting
    Eh, I come pretty close to my handwriting speed with LaTeX

  35. Post #75
    ffFf
    Uber|nooB's Avatar
    June 2005
    5,855 Posts
    Eh, I come pretty close to my handwriting speed with LaTeX
    Even if I could write in LaTeX as fast as I can by hand, I still find manipulating equations way easier on paper by hand than when looking at a computer screen.

  36. Post #76
    Gold Member
    wertel's Avatar
    May 2009
    105 Posts
    The question you must ask yourself is, what will we do if all computers fail? So lets say Y2K happened, and we forgot calligraphy. How would we communicate long distances across the world? Especially in a disaster like this. If you need messages without the aid of electronics you will have to use your amazing calligraphy skills.

  37. Post #77
    Gold Member
    Sgt Doom's Avatar
    March 2005
    20,116 Posts
    It's nice to know, but hardly a requirement. Calligraphy can be quite beautiful, indeed a form of art, but an absolute necessity it is not. It's merely an aesthetic addition, it does not matter in actual work (indeed, one's handwriting might be more legible if not done in cursive, at least for some people I know) or for things that are mostly done by computer now.
    There are some businesses still hooked on the bullshit idea that you can determine a person's likely behaviour and personality from their handwriting, but that's something that needs to be rectified by either legal measures or merely showing people it's utter rubbish, rather than teaching them cursive.
    I'm not against the idea of teaching kids cursive, but it can't really be justified on the basis of it being a useful skill.

  38. Post #78
    Gold Member
    Secrios's Avatar
    March 2011
    1,037 Posts
    Nope, unless signatures count.

  39. Post #79
    Impact1986's Avatar
    December 2011
    1,198 Posts
    I am studying for my engineer degree and I can't think of using Latex for calculations when I am faster on the paper. What about all the exams? How you wanna do exams on a computer?
    You dont have enough time for it.

  40. Post #80
    Gold Member
    ManningQB18's Avatar
    April 2009
    9,855 Posts
    The question you must ask yourself is, what will we do if all computers fail? So lets say Y2K happened, and we forgot calligraphy. How would we communicate long distances across the world? Especially in a disaster like this. If you need messages without the aid of electronics you will have to use your amazing calligraphy skills.
    Its not like nobody knows how to read. People would learn how to physically write fairly quickly,due to the availability of printed documents. Also, that is incredibly unlikely.