1. Post #281
    We're made of star-stuff
    LarparNar's Avatar
    February 2009
    10,170 Posts
    Oh nice, thank you for this. Never knew about those guys.

    Pictures from their mission to get it into orbit.
    You'll be interested to hear then that they have a launch scheduled for April 30th where they will send up their own spacecraft to dock with the ISS (arrives May 3rd).

    Edited:

    That rocket is significantly larger though:

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  2. Post #282
    Gold Member
    DesolateGrun's Avatar
    July 2008
    6,258 Posts
    You'll be interested to hear then that they have a launch scheduled for April 30th where they will send up their own spacecraft to dock with the ISS (arrives May 3rd).

    Edited:

    That rocket is significantly larger though:

    She's a Beaut
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  3. Post #283
    I pushed my dad off the stairs and all I got was he came back
    Aerkhan's Avatar
    October 2009
    4,767 Posts
    Yeah totally, it's only $10.9M
    Am I right to think that's cheap for a spess rokkit?
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  4. Post #284
    It's not like it's going to the moon and back.
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  5. Post #285
    Tony's Avatar
    September 2011
    733 Posts
    In other news, North Korea's rocket that will (supposedly) launch a satellite into orbit, is friggin ugly:

    Lets place bets on how long into its flight time it blows up.

    My money is on it not even getting off the launch pad. :v
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  6. Post #286
    We're made of star-stuff
    LarparNar's Avatar
    February 2009
    10,170 Posts
    Am I right to think that's cheap for a spess rokkit?
    I'm not really sure what every comparable launch vehicle costs, but the Space Shuttle was about $450 M per launch, and that got 7 people and 24 tons into orbit, so that's about double the Falcon 1.

    Space Shuttle is ~$18,75M/ton
    Falcon 1 is ~ $10.8M/ton

    Edited:

    Oh hey just did the maths and.

    Saturn V was $9.83M/ton

    Edited:

    (to LEO)
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  7. Post #287
    Gold Member
    DesolateGrun's Avatar
    July 2008
    6,258 Posts
    It's not like it's going to the moon and back.
    And? This is the first commercial rocket to dock with the ISS, this marks the true beginning of commercializing space other than satellites .

    Edited:

    Godammnit, my telescope isn't arriving until monday
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  8. Post #288
    Star Extraordinaire
    Blazyd's Avatar
    May 2011
    4,424 Posts
    And? This is the first commercial rocket to dock with the ISS, this marks the true beginning of commercializing space other than satellites .

    Edited:

    Godammnit, my telescope isn't arriving until monday
    Grats on getting a telescope. I have my own, and I love it.

    It's kinda complicated at first but once you get used to it it's fun.
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  9. Post #289
    HUGE NERD
    Dacheet's Avatar
    November 2007
    6,304 Posts
    What telescope does everyone have/what do they think of it?
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  10. Post #290
    Gold Member
    DesolateGrun's Avatar
    July 2008
    6,258 Posts
    Grats on getting a telescope. I have my own, and I love it.

    It's kinda complicated at first but once you get used to it it's fun.
    What do you have?

    Edited:

    It's really clear tonight and I can see the Orion nebula through my shitty binocs. It's a grey cloud but still amazing, too bad its fucking cold and the bats are freaking me out again.
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  11. Post #291
    Robbi's Avatar
    March 2012
    1,001 Posts
    You'll be interested to hear then that they have a launch scheduled for April 30th where they will send up their own spacecraft to dock with the ISS (arrives May 3rd).

    Edited:

    That rocket is significantly larger though:
    Yeah I started reading about that, pretty amazing and glad to see space is starting to become more commercial and public :3
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  12. Post #292
    Gold Member
    Pelf's Avatar
    September 2007
    3,001 Posts
    Speaking of SpaceX, new details came out about a proposed launch site in Texas:

    WASHINGTON — Details about a launch facility Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) is considering building in Texas emerged April 9 in a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) document detailing an environmental review that must precede construction.

    The proposed launch site would be used “to launch orbital and suborbital launch vehicles from a private site in Cameron County in southern Texas,” according to the FAA’s notice of its intent to prepare an environmental impact statement. All launches from the proposed spaceport would fly east over the Gulf of Mexico, the document said.

    The proposed Texas facility would be built to handle up to 12 commercial launches a year and would support SpaceX’s Falcon 9 medium rocket and the company’s planned Falcon Heavy launcher for which SpaceX has no paying customers. Falcon 9 launches from the proposed facility would include launches of the Dragon space capsule, which SpaceX plans to begin launching this year from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., to fly cargo to the international space station under a $1.6 billion contract with NASA.

    The FAA document is to be printed in the federal register on April 10, according to a prepublication copy posted on federalregister.gov.

    “SpaceX is considering multiple potential locations around the country for a new commercial launch pad,” SpaceX spokeswoman Kirstin Grantham told Space News April 9. “The Brownsville area is one of the possibilities, but there is a long way to go before this could happen.”

    FAA spokesman Hank Price did not immediately reply to a request for comment.

    In November, SpaceX Chief Executive Elon Musk, said the Hawthorne, Calif.-based company wants to build a launch site that functioned “like a commercial Cape Canaveral.” SpaceX said then that the company was considering sites in Alaska, California, Florida, Texas and Virginia.

    Grantham would not say whether SpaceX had ruled out any of these locations as possible launch sites, nor whether the company had zeroed in on Texas as the site of its proposed commercial launch facility. Currently, SpaceX has launch infrastructure at Cape Canaveral and Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. When it was still marketing the single-engine Falcon 1, SpaceX launched that rocket from Omelek Island in the Kwajalein Atoll. The company also has a rocket test facility in McGregor, Texas, which is about 690 kilometers north of the proposed Brownsville launch site.

    If SpaceX does decide to launch from the Brownsville area, the company would have to build a new vertical launch facility, a control area and a payload integration facility, according to the FAA document.

    “The proposed vertical launch area site is currently undeveloped and is located directly adjacent to the eastern terminus of Texas State Highway 4 (Boca Chica Boulevard) and approximately 3 miles [5 km] north of the Mexican border on the Gulf Coast,” the FAA document says. “It is located approximately 5 miles [8 km] south of Port Isabel and South Padre Island.”

    All spaceport facilities would be on private land owned or leased by SpaceX, although some support facilities could be located off of SpaceX property, the document said.

    Besides orbital spacecraft, the Texas site would also support “a variety of smaller reusable suborbital launch vehicles,” the document said. That could include SpaceX’s Grasshopper vehicle, a test bed for reusable rocket stages comprising a Falcon 9 core stage fitted with landing gear.
    http://www.space.com/15220-spacex-ro...unch-site.html
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  13. Post #293
    stupid10er's Avatar
    January 2010
    3,546 Posts
    i went to the Kennedy Space Center a week ago.

    looks like the visitor center gets more money than NASA itself.
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  14. Post #294
    Gold Member
    DesolateGrun's Avatar
    July 2008
    6,258 Posts
    i went to the Kennedy Space Center a week ago.

    looks like the visitor center gets more money than NASA itself.
    thats the idea
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  15. Post #295
    Gold Member
    magicman1234's Avatar
    September 2008
    5,213 Posts
    In other news, North Korea's rocket that will (supposedly) launch a satellite into orbit, is friggin ugly:

    You didn't hear? They scrapped that design and made a whole new rocket.

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  16. Post #296
    Gold Member
    finbe's Avatar
    June 2010
    2,235 Posts
    Am I right to think that's cheap for a spess rokkit?
    Pretty fucking cheap, hell I have seen 98 million dollar rockets be called cheap.
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  17. Post #297
    HUGE NERD
    Dacheet's Avatar
    November 2007
    6,304 Posts
    Elon Musk on the Daily Show.
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  18. Post #298
    Appreciates Subtle Titles
    NanoSquid's Avatar
    April 2009
    6,789 Posts
    Fucking beautiful.

    And launching on my birthday :D
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  19. Post #299
    ''just wondering''
    Keegs's Avatar
    December 2008
    2,847 Posts
    So one of the requirements for High School graduation is a class called "Senior Research Paper" where you... Write a Research Paper. One of the topics... "NASA Budget and Space Exploration" fuck yes.
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  20. Post #300


    That's a pretty intense photo of Musk. (I also love the lightning)
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  21. Post #301
    Gold Member
    OogalaBoogal's Avatar
    November 2008
    4,060 Posts
    I'm not really sure what every comparable launch vehicle costs, but the Space Shuttle was about $450 M per launch, and that got 7 people and 24 tons into orbit, so that's about double the Falcon 1.

    Space Shuttle is ~$18,75M/ton
    Falcon 1 is ~ $10.8M/ton

    Edited:

    Oh hey just did the maths and.

    Saturn V was $9.83M/ton

    Edited:

    (to LEO)
    24 Million in today's dollars.
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  22. Post #302
    You guys familiar with the Heat-series?

    Made by Danish amateur astronomers. In 2015 they're making the Heat Heavy and being the first amateurs to send a man into suborbital space.

    Edited:

    Here's a little backstory on these guys, all working for free with no budget and no pay, all out of their own pockets.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copenhagen_Suborbitals
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  23. Post #303
    We're made of star-stuff
    LarparNar's Avatar
    February 2009
    10,170 Posts
    24 Million in today's dollars.
    According to Wikipedia (where I got my numbers), it is in todays value. I took the total launch cost and divided by payload capacity. I'll dig out all the values when I'm on a computer.
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  24. Post #304
    Gold Member
    Pilotguy97's Avatar
    November 2010
    4,524 Posts
    Well I just came back from the Smithsonian Air & Space museum and that place is absolutely incredible. Although I am ashamed with myself, since I mistook a miniature Vostok capsule and a GRAB satellite for Sputnik.

    Oh yeah and, uh, hi thread.
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  25. Post #305
    Could one in the future make rockets out of carbon nanotube? If they in fact are super-solid, light, cheap and heat resistant they'd be the perfect material to make rockets out of once one can grow long strands.
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  26. Post #306
    Tony's Avatar
    September 2011
    733 Posts
    That's probably one of the two challenges that I reckon we have with space at the moment. The first is actually having a decent material to make spacecraft out of, and the second is propulsion.
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  27. Post #307
    Gold Member
    Pelf's Avatar
    September 2007
    3,001 Posts
    You guys familiar with the Heat-series?

    Made by Danish amateur astronomers. In 2015 they're making the Heat Heavy and being the first amateurs to send a man into suborbital space.

    Edited:

    Here's a little backstory on these guys, all working for free with no budget and no pay, all out of their own pockets.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copenhagen_Suborbitals
    They're moving beyond that little rocket now:


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  28. Post #308
    Reply With Quote Edit / Delete Mac Denmark Show Events

  29. Post #309
    Dog
    What's worse than biting into an apple and finding a dick?
    Dog's Avatar
    March 2011
    3,767 Posts
    I spent a minute trying to unselect that

    god damn blue
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  30. Post #310
    We're made of star-stuff
    LarparNar's Avatar
    February 2009
    10,170 Posts
    24 Million in today's dollars.
    Here we go:

    In 1969, the cost of a Saturn V including launch was US $ 185 million (inflation adjusted US$ 1.17 billion in 2012)
    Payload capacity is 119 000 kg (119 tons) to LEO.

    1.17 billion = 1 170 million

    $1 170M / 119 = ~$9.832

    In 1969 dollars it was ~$1.55M/ton
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  31. Post #311
    Venus has been so bright the past few nights.
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  32. Post #312
    I pushed my dad off the stairs and all I got was he came back
    Aerkhan's Avatar
    October 2009
    4,767 Posts
    I'm not really sure what every comparable launch vehicle costs, but the Space Shuttle was about $450 M per launch, and that got 7 people and 24 tons into orbit, so that's about double the Falcon 1.

    Space Shuttle is ~$18,75M/ton
    Falcon 1 is ~ $10.8M/ton

    Edited:

    Oh hey just did the maths and.

    Saturn V was $9.83M/ton

    Edited:

    (to LEO)
    I only see numbers, and I just rated informative, as I can't maths.
    So the conclusion is...?
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  33. Post #313
    Gold Member
    DesolateGrun's Avatar
    July 2008
    6,258 Posts
    I only see numbers, and I just rated informative, as I can't maths.
    So the conclusion is...?
    ...figure out which costs less to send a ton into orbit. Saturn V was only cheaper because it needed a much more powerful engine to lift itself.
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  34. Post #314
    We were talking about the Kruskal extension to the Schwarzschild metric today in GR and about how a test particle travelling along a null path could theoretically traverse the event horizon and end up on the event horizon of the white hole of an alternate spacetime, but if the contribution of a photon to the stress-energy tensor is actually considered, it messes up the metric so it's no longer possible to enter the alternate spacetime along anything but a spacelike path, and someone asked, "What if it was an antimatter particle instead?"

    I wonder how some of these people get into senior-level physics classes.
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  35. Post #315
    Gold Member
    Pelf's Avatar
    September 2007
    3,001 Posts
    I just rated funny because I don't understand any of it. vv
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  36. Post #316
    Falubii's Avatar
    May 2010
    3,522 Posts
    We were talking about the Kruskal extension to the Schwarzschild metric today in GR and about how a test particle travelling along a null path could theoretically traverse the event horizon and end up on the event horizon of the white hole of an alternate spacetime, but if the contribution of a photon to the stress-energy tensor is actually considered, it messes up the metric so it's no longer possible to enter the alternate spacetime along anything but a spacelike path, and someone asked, "What if it was an antimatter particle instead?"

    I wonder how some of these people get into senior-level physics classes.
    You seem to know what you're talking about. I was wondering if even a senior level physicist understood general relativity, or if it's still way too confusing.
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  37. Post #317
    Gold Member
    DesolateGrun's Avatar
    July 2008
    6,258 Posts
    We were talking about the Kruskal extension to the Schwarzschild metric today in GR and about how a test particle travelling along a null path could theoretically traverse the event horizon and end up on the event horizon of the white hole of an alternate spacetime, but if the contribution of a photon to the stress-energy tensor is actually considered, it messes up the metric so it's no longer possible to enter the alternate spacetime along anything but a spacelike path, and someone asked, "What if it was an antimatter particle instead?"

    I wonder how some of these people get into senior-level physics classes.
    Hold on, the white hole theory doesn't even have a good backing behind it. It just says what go in must come out.
    Might as well have black holes pooping out star children at their deaths.
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  38. Post #318
    Hold on, the white hole theory doesn't even have a good backing behind it. It just says what go in must come out.
    Might as well have black holes pooping out star children at their deaths.
    Firstly, I made no claim that it was necessarily true. Secondly, how much do you know about GR and white holes? That is not at all the justification for it.
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  39. Post #319
    I am a moderator.
    Swebonny's Avatar
    August 2006
    13,082 Posts
    Hold on, the white hole theory doesn't even have a good backing behind it. It just says what go in must come out.
    Might as well have black holes pooping out star children at their deaths.
    I haven't taken any course in GR, but after browsing the Wiki it seems that the whole white hole business is derived from a specific solution (maximally extended version of the Schwarzschild metric) of Einstein's field equations which uses a number negative.

    Some magic I'm not so sure of:
    The transformation between Schwarzschild coordinates and Kruskal–Szekeres coordinates is defined for r > 0, r ≠ 2GM, and −∞ < t < ∞, which is the range for which the Schwarzschild coordinates make sense. However, the coordinates (V, U) can be extended over every value possible without hitting the physical singularity. The allowed values are



    Anyhow if you draw this set you get a hyperbola that is bounded by 1 (the event horizon?). So the white holes are everything that is below U?Correct me if I'm wrong.
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  40. Post #320
    Yes, that. Kruskal coordinates give back the normal Schwarzschild coordinates, but handles them in only half of R^4. Then the natural extension to the other half gives two more regions, one inside and one outside an event horizon, but it's a time reversal of the black hole that spits things out rather than sucking them in.
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