1. Post #3321
    theLazyLion's Avatar
    March 2010
    1,741 Posts
    http://dl.dropbox.com/u/12913216/Art...0bounceslq.swf
    More of me just enjoying playing around in flash.
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  2. Post #3322
    Gold Member
    D3TBS's Avatar
    March 2011
    8,735 Posts
    I do the paint. 18''x24'' acrylics. I also decided to make a thread for all my shit
    i really love the textures in the pavement, shame it kinda loses that feel at the top
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  3. Post #3323
    Gold Member
    Maloof?'s Avatar
    December 2006
    7,131 Posts
    Nearly done

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  4. Post #3324
    theLazyLion's Avatar
    March 2010
    1,741 Posts
    Nearly done

    This is looking very compositionally sound. And has a nice feel of atmosphere to it.. I think its time for you to push your works further by applying at least a certain level of temperature change to your art. Basically instead of having a darker value shadow of that local color, you use a shadow color that's tinted with the complimentary color of your main light source. In this piece you have a slight greenish yellow as your light source color.. Very subtle though, so you'd wanna keep your shadow colors even more subtle than that, probably tinting your shadows with a slight redish violet as that's the complimentary to yellow green. Temperature change is definitely something that occurs in nature, and is usually just an optical illusion tricking the eye. Usually in nature its a lot more subtle, but as an artist its your choice whether you wish to push that illusion and force even more depth in your work or keep it realistically subtle.
    You can refer to this older post of mine for a little bit more information on temperature change and a bit on color theory: http://facepunch.com/threads/1011743...1#post25374402

    Another thing I'd like to see you do before finishing this piece is applying a bit of variety to the foreground shape and not have the land mass cover up the entire bottom of the painting, it kind of turns it into a forced and unnatural frame like object that doesn't really help to any advantage. Break up it's shape so it's more natural looking and maybe darken it up a bit to bring it a bit further into the foreground.
    Anyways, great job, cant wait to see it finished.

    I do the paint. 18''x24'' acrylics. I also decided to make a thread for all my shit
    This is looking quite nice, I remember suggesting that this would be a bitch to paint but you seemed to handle it quite elegantly.. Good job on that :)
    Especially good work with the ground texturing on the left.. Only a couple of problems I'm finding with this is that some of the lights that are being reflected onto the ground appear even more saturated than the actual light sources that are casting the reflections onto the ground. I think you should have used pure whites in the center of those lights above the ground, with vibrant primary colors glowing around them, in areas like the top left, you have muddied lights, the white of the light is turning kind of light brown and isn't reading as a light source. The colored rings/glows around them aren't as saturated as the reflections on the ground making it hard to read as being an actual light source.. so I'd just say pump up your saturation around the light sources. Much like you have with that yellow light source in the middle left area.

    Another thing I'd like to mention is mind your edges.. When you paint things like you did with the sky over there, having it be a certain value then at the edges where the sky meets the buildings becomes faint, you lose a lot of depth. Because it brings the sky to the same level as the building, instead of pushing the sky behind the building, thus flattening the image and also making it look a tad bit sloppy.

    Other than those things, I think it turned out great and looks very lively.. Nice job :)
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  5. Post #3325
    Walls black like black waters, when they are heavy and seem to belong to other seas
    MakoSkyDub's Avatar
    January 2011
    7,313 Posts
    http://dl.dropbox.com/u/12913216/Art...0bounceslq.swf
    More of me just enjoying playing around in flash.
    I love Big Sur Moon

    Edited:

    By the way Lazy could you drop any pearls of wisdom about blending paint (digitally)? Your stuff looks airbrushed to me but you've also got some hard edges in there, I have a hard time with that since I just started to dip my toes in. And for your skin tones do you pick a base coat and work in tints and shades? Or continually colour pick? Any tips you can give would be great
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  6. Post #3326
    theLazyLion's Avatar
    March 2010
    1,741 Posts
    I love Big Sur Moon

    Edited:

    By the way Lazy could you drop any pearls of wisdom about blending paint (digitally)? Your stuff looks airbrushed to me but you've also got some hard edges in there, I have a hard time with that since I just started to dip my toes in. And for your skin tones do you pick a base coat and work in tints and shades? Or continually colour pick? Any tips you can give would be great
    The song I used was actually Ewan Dobsons "Time 2".. Didn't realize how much it sounds inspired off of Big Sur Moon though.

    Anyways, I don't really air brush my work.. Mostly everything I work with is with hard edges.. and keep blending until I get softer look in areas I don't want to read as focal points.. Keeping the harder edges only for important areas. The reason I never start off a painting using soft edges/air brushing is because its easier to paint things soft/blurry, but harder to get things crisp and sharp. So I paint everything down as sharp and clear as I can and then have the ability to just pick and choose if I want, what to soften or leave sharp and crisp... And usually just starting things out with a soft air brush ends up looking so blurry in the beginning stages, as a concept artist this is a no no, because usually you don't have time to refine your work in this field.. So a lot of times you will just be submitting work in progresses, and handing in blurry scraps isn't as helpful as submitting a work in progress with clear sharp shapes.
    This thing from my thread shows my progress fairly well. Start off with flat sharp shapes, and later end up softening out of focal areas. Sorry for not having earlier snap shots of this piece though.



    And normally I start off my work in black and white so I can make sure my values are at the best they can be before jumping to color(when working without reference), then create a layer for color on top of that, lay in a base coat of colors, then create a soft light/overlay layer and use that to adjust values with the new colors added.. then flatten the image and start rendering with colored brush strokes over that, usually adding different hues and variation to colors/temperature change/etc as I refine details/edges... And yeah I rely heavily on color picking, normally after adding in the colors I will be using in the piece I just color pick off of those and keep on going, every once in a while grabbing a new color from the color wheel if necessary.

    Hope this helps :)
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  7. Post #3327
    Walls black like black waters, when they are heavy and seem to belong to other seas
    MakoSkyDub's Avatar
    January 2011
    7,313 Posts
    Many thanks, I'll try to adjust my process a bit, see if I can't reach a comfort zone.

    I think calling that track anything other than a Big Sur Moon remix or cover is a joke, but whatever.

    Here's my first digital piece anyway:



    Unfinished obviously, but I think I've learned everything I'm going to learn from it and I'm tired of it anyway. Pretty happy with it as far as it went.

    Couple of close ups;





    Any crit would be awesome

    Also Lazy while I'm on the topic, insights on the process for painting hair and any brush preferences would be great as well (I'm experimenting with Painter for now, don't know how much you've worked in it but I seem to remember you mentioned painting something or other with it)

    A whole lot of the brushes seem overly idiosyncratic to be useful for all-purpose painting; I certainly don't mind coming out with more impressionist stuff due to a "clumsier" medium but I don't like producing too much of the same mark or texture plus I'd like to work with one brush as much as possible, at least to begin with

    Cheers
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  8. Post #3328
    Gold Member
    Maloof?'s Avatar
    December 2006
    7,131 Posts
    This is looking very compositionally sound. And has a nice feel of atmosphere to it.. I think its time for you to push your works further by applying at least a certain level of temperature change to your art. Basically instead of having a darker value shadow of that local color, you use a shadow color that's tinted with the complimentary color of your main light source. In this piece you have a slight greenish yellow as your light source color.. Very subtle though, so you'd wanna keep your shadow colors even more subtle than that, probably tinting your shadows with a slight redish violet as that's the complimentary to yellow green. Temperature change is definitely something that occurs in nature, and is usually just an optical illusion tricking the eye. Usually in nature its a lot more subtle, but as an artist its your choice whether you wish to push that illusion and force even more depth in your work or keep it realistically subtle.
    You can refer to this older post of mine for a little bit more information on temperature change and a bit on color theory: http://facepunch.com/threads/1011743...1#post25374402

    Another thing I'd like to see you do before finishing this piece is applying a bit of variety to the foreground shape and not have the land mass cover up the entire bottom of the painting, it kind of turns it into a forced and unnatural frame like object that doesn't really help to any advantage. Break up it's shape so it's more natural looking and maybe darken it up a bit to bring it a bit further into the foreground.
    Anyways, great job, cant wait to see it finished.

    Thanks! I'm still exploring shadow and colour. I tend to take the ambient colour - either the locally reflected light in closed spaces such as the house by the bridge in the lower left area or the light reflected from the clouds/atmosphere - as the tint for shadows, simply pulling the colour hue very slightly clockwise or anticlockwise around the colour wheel to get the appropriate shadow colour. I'm definately not just picking darker values xD

    Thanks for the critique - I'll take a look at your colour theory post when I can.


    The foreground is going to be changed a bit. I've planned to put a figure looking at the scene
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  9. Post #3329
    Xephio's Avatar
    December 2009
    3,696 Posts


    both took an hour each during class
    becus yu know fuk skool.
    Edited:
    HOW DO I MAKE THEM SMALLER HGBFBFHFJDSPPD
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  10. Post #3330
    I am a moderator.
    Swebonny's Avatar
    August 2006
    13,242 Posts
    A month ago I made a thread in here asking about general tips on how I could draw something more interesting than what I did during elementary school.
    So since then I've been been drawing circles, cubes and cylinders for ever since I've had time. I think I've done a few hundred if not thousand of circles and cubes.

    So from my cubes and pyramids I made this house in the woods thing. Uh it's kinda messy because I made a shit ton of errors.



    And from all the cylinders I've been drawing I made an arm. To make it a bit more interesting I threw in some small people. The hand looks kinda messed up because I don't know yet how to draw hands.



    All the things I've done are really small since I don't feel comfortable working on large surfaces. But I guess it'll feel better after more practice. It's a good thing this section is active. This thread and the sketchbooks threads motivates me a lot.
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  11. Post #3331
    Walls black like black waters, when they are heavy and seem to belong to other seas
    MakoSkyDub's Avatar
    January 2011
    7,313 Posts
    Your shading is a bit aimless and scribbly. Parallel lines are your friend, or the side of your pencil to put smooth coats of graphite on the paper. Also you're working in all midtones, get some contrast happening, from white to almost black.

    Also, draw from life. Train your eye's intuition for relative size and foreshortening and all of that. Your imagination will progress too while you're doing so. Drawing often works like that; improving one area will produce a positive effect in others.

    The small drawings thing is a pretty common misconception for new artists I think. You might not think so, but it's easier to draw larger, at least in my experience (I had the same thing).
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  12. Post #3332
    I am a moderator.
    Swebonny's Avatar
    August 2006
    13,242 Posts
    Thanks for the tips! I'll post something new in a month. Hopefully with some improvements hehe.

    Edited:

    By the way, is there some good resource that talks about shading? Do you have any specific tip or rule that you follow, or is it something partly intuitive?
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  13. Post #3333
    Gold Member
    D3TBS's Avatar
    March 2011
    8,735 Posts
    When it comes to cross hatching, i usually just follow the "flow" of the object. I don't really cross them 90º because I feel it totally kills the drawing.

    For example, observe the portraits on the bank notes. Fucking Euros don't have them but probably most of them follow this technique
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  14. Post #3334
    Beverage Bandit
    kevlar jens's Avatar
    November 2005
    19,210 Posts
    had an assignment on doing an Art Nouveau thingie
    so i made a MGS3-poster, heavily based on Eugène Grasset's work.



    also, i was a stupid idiot that thought it could be done in one day that's why the flowers are so terrible and the ear blows + +
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  15. Post #3335
    Walls black like black waters, when they are heavy and seem to belong to other seas
    MakoSkyDub's Avatar
    January 2011
    7,313 Posts
    When it comes to cross hatching, i usually just follow the "flow" of the object. I don't really cross them 90º because I feel it totally kills the drawing.

    For example, observe the portraits on the bank notes. Fucking Euros don't have them but probably most of them follow this technique
    That would be contouring, different technique.
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  16. Post #3336
    Gold Member
    Ganerumo's Avatar
    September 2011
    17,960 Posts
    had an assignment on doing an Art Nouveau thingie
    so i made a MGS3-poster, heavily based on Eugène Grasset's work.



    also, i was a stupid idiot that thought it could be done in one day that's why the flowers are so terrible and the ear blows + +
    You shouldn't have translated the names into French. I've played the French version of the game and the names stay in English. Also you made a typo at Mangeur de serpents (which is also kept as Snake Eater in French). Just thought you'd like to know.

    Anyway here's a drawing I made. It was originally a simple attempt at doing proper anatomy, and I felt like adding some clothes and color to it because why not.



    Here's an Outline version and the original drawing that was made on real paper.
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  17. Post #3337
    Walls black like black waters, when they are heavy and seem to belong to other seas
    MakoSkyDub's Avatar
    January 2011
    7,313 Posts
    By the way, is there some good resource that talks about shading? Do you have any specific tip or rule that you follow, or is it something partly intuitive?
    Hm, well for realism you'll want to model the forms of what you're drawing, which usually means sharpening your pencil so that a good amount of the graphite is showing and then using the side. Not completely on the side, because that's hard to control and gives unpredictable coverage, but not on the point of the pencil obviously. Go for a middle ground and wear down a surface, you'll know when it feels right. I find when doing work like that, where you need to draw in gradients and stuff like that, your grip is really important. You're not really mark-making so much as coating the paper, like painting sort of.

    This might be the grip I would use most often:



    Three fingers, plenty of length, gentle and steady hold. This will do for all the lighter end of the spectrum when shading, plus I'll use it to rough out the shapes of what I'm drawing at the start. It's good to do framework like this because anything you do with this grip can be taken right back off with an eraser. Then for the darker stuff:



    Almost identical, but this time with the butt of the pencil pushed back until it's planted into the top of your palm. When you're shading like this, you can adjust the amount of pressure you exert onto the paper perfectly by gently pulling the pencil back into your hand with the three fingers holding it. If you pull it back so it's rigid against your hand, you can get strong darks and still be in complete control of what you're doing - the technique is still gentle. The darker you go, the more you'll be using your wrist, too. The above lighter grip will take its movement from the elbow or even the shoulder a little bit.

    Here's a close up of where exactly the pencil is pressing for me



    You should only really use variations of your writing grip to define curves and things like that. You wouldn't really shade with it. Shading requires a rhythmic A to B kind of movement, and with a writing grip the fulcrum of movement comes right down to the knuckle of your little finger, so it's not really suitable. Probably best to refrain using a grip like that until you come to the details of your drawings; it's good for curves as I said but if you get caught up in etching outlines into your paper for example in the early stages of your drawing, you'll end up with heavy outlines which can flatten your finished piece. For example where the light directly hits an object, you don't want a heavy outline. You might not have an outline at all around that point. Likewise on the shadowed side, you'll want the shadow to form the edge by itself, which means if you have a hard outline you'll have to match that shade going inwards as best you can, which doesn't always work, especially if you've gone over the outline five times or something to get a stronger cleaner line. This is something I still do, so I advise resisting even though it makes your initial lineart sketch look better.

    So that's the basics on the realism scale kind of, if you're going for impressionist or conceptual or you just want to do a QUICK drawing that looks nice and finished, you should get into hatching. I should say I haven't been drawing much for a while, but when I was I was addicted to shading using hatching. That is, using many parallel lines to create shadows. You can be pretty brutal and loose and carefree, or that's how I like to shade with line at least. I use a grip something like this, to straitjacket the pencil so I can get good straight dark lines when I want them:



    Keep the wrist locked and draw completely from the elbow for best results. By layers of crosshatching you can make shadows as complex as you need (Example, something I've posted here before at some point: http://i.imgur.com/R6Qmf.jpg) or you can just give really simple indications of lighting and have a pleasant drawing to look at even if it took you two minutes or something (may also have posted this: http://i.imgur.com/7iD8P.jpg)

    I would post an example of contouring as well but imgur is being a dickhead atm. The idea is to wrap lines around the form you're drawing, and if you want to tie in light and shadow you can taper them off where the light hits and ease them in heavier where the shadows are.

    I may have a rambled a bit, hope that was useful.
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  18. Post #3338
    Judge, Jury, & Executioner
    Rusty100's Avatar
    September 2005
    63,949 Posts
    had an assignment on doing an Art Nouveau thingie
    so i made a MGS3-poster, heavily based on Eugène Grasset's work.



    also, i was a stupid idiot that thought it could be done in one day that's why the flowers are so terrible and the ear blows + +
    should have done one for "Les Enfant Terribles"
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  19. Post #3339
    Gold Member
    D3TBS's Avatar
    March 2011
    8,735 Posts
    That would be contouring, different technique.
    The bank note thing? That was just an example of the "following the flow" part

    Edited:

    also I've been told to draw it with this hand position

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  20. Post #3340
    I am a moderator.
    Swebonny's Avatar
    August 2006
    13,242 Posts
    Thanks a thousand man, very informative.
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  21. Post #3341
    Gold Member
    wewt!'s Avatar
    July 2008
    12,341 Posts
    Hm, well for realism you'll want to model the forms of what you're drawing, which usually means sharpening your pencil so that a good amount of the graphite is showing and then using the side. Not completely on the side, because that's hard to control and gives unpredictable coverage, but not on the point of the pencil obviously. Go for a middle ground and wear down a surface, you'll know when it feels right. I find when doing work like that, where you need to draw in gradients and stuff like that, your grip is really important. You're not really mark-making so much as coating the paper, like painting sort of.

    This might be the grip I would use most often:



    Three fingers, plenty of length, gentle and steady hold. This will do for all the lighter end of the spectrum when shading, plus I'll use it to rough out the shapes of what I'm drawing at the start. It's good to do framework like this because anything you do with this grip can be taken right back off with an eraser. Then for the darker stuff:



    Almost identical, but this time with the butt of the pencil pushed back until it's planted into the top of your palm. When you're shading like this, you can adjust the amount of pressure you exert onto the paper perfectly by gently pulling the pencil back into your hand with the three fingers holding it. If you pull it back so it's rigid against your hand, you can get strong darks and still be in complete control of what you're doing - the technique is still gentle. The darker you go, the more you'll be using your wrist, too. The above lighter grip will take its movement from the elbow or even the shoulder a little bit.

    Here's a close up of where exactly the pencil is pressing for me



    You should only really use variations of your writing grip to define curves and things like that. You wouldn't really shade with it. Shading requires a rhythmic A to B kind of movement, and with a writing grip the fulcrum of movement comes right down to the knuckle of your little finger, so it's not really suitable. Probably best to refrain using a grip like that until you come to the details of your drawings; it's good for curves as I said but if you get caught up in etching outlines into your paper for example in the early stages of your drawing, you'll end up with heavy outlines which can flatten your finished piece. For example where the light directly hits an object, you don't want a heavy outline. You might not have an outline at all around that point. Likewise on the shadowed side, you'll want the shadow to form the edge by itself, which means if you have a hard outline you'll have to match that shade going inwards as best you can, which doesn't always work, especially if you've gone over the outline five times or something to get a stronger cleaner line. This is something I still do, so I advise resisting even though it makes your initial lineart sketch look better.

    So that's the basics on the realism scale kind of, if you're going for impressionist or conceptual or you just want to do a QUICK drawing that looks nice and finished, you should get into hatching. I should say I haven't been drawing much for a while, but when I was I was addicted to shading using hatching. That is, using many parallel lines to create shadows. You can be pretty brutal and loose and carefree, or that's how I like to shade with line at least. I use a grip something like this, to straitjacket the pencil so I can get good straight dark lines when I want them:



    Keep the wrist locked and draw completely from the elbow for best results. By layers of crosshatching you can make shadows as complex as you need (Example, something I've posted here before at some point: http://i.imgur.com/R6Qmf.jpg) or you can just give really simple indications of lighting and have a pleasant drawing to look at even if it took you two minutes or something (may also have posted this: http://i.imgur.com/7iD8P.jpg)

    I would post an example of contouring as well but imgur is being a dickhead atm. The idea is to wrap lines around the form you're drawing, and if you want to tie in light and shadow you can taper them off where the light hits and ease them in heavier where the shadows are.

    I may have a rambled a bit, hope that was useful.
    tbh I found the specifics of the grip to be the most subjective thing there is, my only advice would just be to use light strokes and hold the pencil a bit further back, everything else is up to his comfort
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  22. Post #3342
    Gold Member
    MenteR's Avatar
    July 2007
    5,432 Posts
    The bank note thing? That was just an example of the "following the flow" part

    Edited:

    also I've been told to draw it with this hand position

    well it's definitely going to be a lot steadier when you have SIX FINGERS
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  23. Post #3343
    Gold Member
    Ajacks's Avatar
    August 2006
    4,459 Posts
    24x36, something like that oil painting I just finished, just a shade on the tedious side, lol.

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  24. Post #3344
    theLazyLion's Avatar
    March 2010
    1,741 Posts
    Many thanks, I'll try to adjust my process a bit, see if I can't reach a comfort zone.

    I think calling that track anything other than a Big Sur Moon remix or cover is a joke, but whatever.

    Here's my first digital piece anyway:



    Unfinished obviously, but I think I've learned everything I'm going to learn from it and I'm tired of it anyway. Pretty happy with it as far as it went.

    Couple of close ups;





    Any crit would be awesome

    Also Lazy while I'm on the topic, insights on the process for painting hair and any brush preferences would be great as well (I'm experimenting with Painter for now, don't know how much you've worked in it but I seem to remember you mentioned painting something or other with it)

    A whole lot of the brushes seem overly idiosyncratic to be useful for all-purpose painting; I certainly don't mind coming out with more impressionist stuff due to a "clumsier" medium but I don't like producing too much of the same mark or texture plus I'd like to work with one brush as much as possible, at least to begin with

    Cheers
    The images you posted seem somewhat compressed.. Not sure why. Anyways, the painting is looking quite nice, maybe getting a bit too soft around the edges, which doesn't give enough separation of the face from the background, it also seems to be the same value as the mid tone of the face, these two things start flattening out the image slightly. Even being unfinished, something like that is good to keep in mind when working from the start(how to pop your character out into 3d space even more than just shading realistically).

    I'd also watch out for leaving things saturated all around the overall picture.. Especially with a close up portrait like this, you want to give as much variety as you can in such a small space. Don't leave everything of equal saturation just the way you wont leave everything at equal hue or value.. By the way, that green mark next to her eye is a nice touch, it's just a bit too saturated and kind of distracting. Not really much else I can comment on seeing as its incomplete..

    As for hair, in Painter, I just use some variety of oil brushes. I believe it's just the normal oil bristle brush. It's what I normally use for everything, but also works well for hair.
    When working with hair, I think it's usually best to lay in the darkest value of the hair you're going to be drawing, just a flat shape determining hair structure. Once you get down the flat darker hair structure, you can start using a thinner brush, and a slightly lighter color/value, and start laying in thick strands of hair, to direct hair flow. Then grab an even smaller brush, with a lighter color/value, and start drawing in strands in key areas that receive the most light.. You don't need to spend time drawing individual strands in areas out of light.. At least during the start.. Maybe once you're done with the painting you can go in and use a very low contrasted value/color and draw in some strands in those darker areas.

    Once you get enough strands drawn into the hair, you could try taking taking a blender from the blender brushes (not sure which one to use though, I always end up switching them up, just play around with them) and drag that blender lightly along the form of the hair, so if the hair is falling straight down, you'd drag the blender brush lightly straight from top to down following the strands and form.. This helps blend the brush strokes together so it doesn't make all the strands look too separated from each other.

    This is also How I'd approach hair in Photoshop as well. Usually blending with the mixer brush after I'm done laying in the strands of hair.

    Edited:

    Also Swebonny you might be interested in getting yourself a woodless graphtie pencil..


    Basically a graphite pencil just completely graphite.. no wood around it.. So you can turn it onto its side and hold it like a paint brush, and you can lay in thick shapes of values just like a paint brush.. Helps with getting down values faster without having to rely on tedious crosshatching/hatching.

    Edited:

    24x36, something like that oil painting I just finished, just a shade on the tedious side, lol.

    I like the concept behind this, and the style is quite nice to look at, just a question, why not place the boat at least somewhere on the left of the painting? Because right now it's a bit compositionally heavy towards the right.
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  25. Post #3345
    dai
    "arte"
    dai's Avatar
    February 2006
    26,705 Posts
    I like the concept behind this, and the style is quite nice to look at, just a question, why not place the boat at least somewhere on the left of the painting? Because right now it's a bit compositionally heavy towards the right.
    Personally I like the weight being overbearing with the guy painting. I think throwing off the compositional balance serves to make him feel more unwelcome and intrusive on the scene he's trying to cover up

    but, that's just me and my "what would an artsnob critic praise it for" senses tingling, heh.
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  26. Post #3346
    theLazyLion's Avatar
    March 2010
    1,741 Posts
    Personally I like the weight being overbearing with the guy painting. I think throwing off the compositional balance serves to make him feel more unwelcome and intrusive on the scene he's trying to cover up

    but, that's just me and my "what would an artsnob critic praise it for" senses tingling, heh.
    Yeah I can see what you mean, the only problem I really have for it being composed like that is the left being so empty, and because its empty It kind of doesn't really have that much of an impact of the man covering up an empty space.. If there were more boats, or dolphins jumping out of the water, or something more. Then there would be more things to feel something for than just a blank space, with one boat almost already covered up. I don't know, maybe even just adding some clouds to the sky could have helped. It's a great piece, just feel like there's potential for more.
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  27. Post #3347
    Gold Member
    ChestyMcGee's Avatar
    August 2008
    25,848 Posts
    had an assignment on doing an Art Nouveau thingie
    so i made a MGS3-poster, heavily based on Eugène Grasset's work.



    also, i was a stupid idiot that thought it could be done in one day that's why the flowers are so terrible and the ear blows + +
    i like the style and the idea but the face isn't very accurate to the character. i think the overbite is too strong and the chin/jaw too weak
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  28. Post #3348
    babyarm-bat's Avatar
    January 2009
    2,131 Posts
    Yeah I can see what you mean, the only problem I really have for it being composed like that is the left being so empty, and because its empty It kind of doesn't really have that much of an impact of the man covering up an empty space.. If there were more boats, or dolphins jumping out of the water, or something more. Then there would be more things to feel something for than just a blank space, with one boat almost already covered up. I don't know, maybe even just adding some clouds to the sky could have helped. It's a great piece, just feel like there's potential for more.
    I think the lack of things on the left makes it peaceful, so the red is doubly intrusive on the scene. And the fact that the line on the bottom indicates it's a wall being painted is cool. Also the way it slants making the ocean take up more of the canvas as it goes left is neat, how it leads away/from the painter. Clouds probably would have been cool though
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  29. Post #3349
    Gold Member
    LaughingStock's Avatar
    August 2010
    8,079 Posts
    This page has some pretty neat stuff.

    Right now I'm working on a few animations for a game which is basically a pipe dream as of now. It's about a legless frog because I'm a lazy animator

    I jazzed it up in flash. MSPaint version for comparison:
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  30. Post #3350
    Gold Member
    Ajacks's Avatar
    August 2006
    4,459 Posts
    Nice discussion going on, lol. I chose to weigh it over to the right to give it some more tension, obviously I played with the placement of the boat and I think that logically it would make sense to place the boat to the left and draw the eye over that way but that wouldn't have achieved the tension I wanted. When the boat was removed from immediate danger of being painted over it lost some of the relationship with the painter himself, they became isolated and separate, their proximity links them and implies some kind of relationship I think, but hey it's art and it's up for discussion.
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  31. Post #3351
    theLazyLion's Avatar
    March 2010
    1,741 Posts
    I had a feeling one of the reasons for that was to create tension between the two subjects. But I'd still suggest not leaving the entire left area blank and empty.. A way to do that without removing the tension between the two subjects would be maybe some subtle graphic water ripples, or some flat shaped clouds.. Something so it doesn't look too boring on that side and give viewers even more reason to react to the painter covering up all those interesting things, while still retaining tension between the painter and the boat. If done subtly and correctly, it would add so much more without distracting from the two subjects.
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  32. Post #3352
    Gold Member
    Ajacks's Avatar
    August 2006
    4,459 Posts
    I had a feeling one of the reasons for that was to create tension between the two subjects. But I'd still suggest not leaving the entire left area blank and empty.. A way to do that without removing the tension between the two subjects would be maybe some subtle graphic water ripples, or some flat shaped clouds.. Something so it doesn't look too boring on that side and give viewers even more reason to react to the painter covering up all those interesting things, while still retaining tension between the painter and the boat. If done subtly and correctly, it would add so much more without distracting from the two subjects.
    Before this ultimately makes it into a student show in a few weeks it will get a subtle sky gradient, that might address some of the visual lackings of the left side, while introducing a nice contrast between the naturalistic features of the sky and the harsh, blocked out colors used in the rest of the piece. Not looking forward to yet another pass along the horizon, keeping it perfect is tedious, lol.
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  33. Post #3353
    Gold Member
    D3TBS's Avatar
    March 2011
    8,735 Posts
    well it's definitely going to be a lot steadier when you have SIX FINGERS

    What, you guys don't have six fingers?
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  34. Post #3354
    Gold Member
    DOG-GY's Avatar
    June 2009
    13,293 Posts
    eh i hate holding pencils like that (d3tbs)

    i know some people who draw beautifully like that but it's just not 4 me
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  35. Post #3355
    Gold Member
    Maloof?'s Avatar
    December 2006
    7,131 Posts
    Pencil holding (like most things) comes under 'do what works for you'. Same with paint brush holding.


    I WILL SAY THIS, however, and that is that some methods of holding a pencil may be more 'healthy' than others. I say this because I spent the last 3 days doing roughly 8 hours a day of drawing on a Graphire 4 tablet and now it hurts a bit to move my right hand in certain ways.

    I'm no doctor but I don't want no RSI up in this business. Can anybody else shed some light on this?

    This is not a 'Help me Doctor Facepunch post but rather a 'let's talk about RSI for the good of everybody' post. If the pain is still there on Monday I will hit up my doctor about it
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  36. Post #3356
    Walls black like black waters, when they are heavy and seem to belong to other seas
    MakoSkyDub's Avatar
    January 2011
    7,313 Posts
    The bank note thing? That was just an example of the "following the flow" part
    What I meant was it's not hatching if you're following contours, hatching means straight lines

    also I've been told to draw it with this hand position

    I would use that grip for drawing upright, I.E on an easel.

    tbh I found the specifics of the grip to be the most subjective thing there is, my only advice would just be to use light strokes and hold the pencil a bit further back, everything else is up to his comfort
    Aye, but I think it's always helpful to get insights into what works for someone else. For example I probably won't follow Lazy's workflow to the letter, but it could influence the way I do things when I try the methods he described. People's art styles are for the most part a composite of influences after all

    Thanks for the crit, and thanks a lot for the hair advice <3
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  37. Post #3357
    Gold Member
    The Vman's Avatar
    December 2008
    8,158 Posts
    I find it funny that there's more Teen Deer fanart than there are actual pieces made by Detlef.
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  38. Post #3358
    Gold Member
    Maloof?'s Avatar
    December 2006
    7,131 Posts
    I find it funny that there's more Teen Deer fanart than there are actual pieces made by Detlef.
    Detlef's are generally much higher quality in terms of character design and plot development. Most of mine are just deer puns
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  39. Post #3359
    Gold Member
    DOG-GY's Avatar
    June 2009
    13,293 Posts
    real question was the toon shaded render of teen deer i posted creepy or something? im planning on lighting it with subsurface scattering to look like vinyl
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  40. Post #3360
    Here's to giving Garry Newman more money.
    Chaplin's Avatar
    August 2011
    5,217 Posts
    I like it! It's very imaginative.

    Edited:

    I find it funny that there's more Teen Deer fanart than there are actual pieces made by Detlef.
    What happened to Detlef anyway? She updates her DA, but she never posts here no more D:
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