1. Post #1
    Gold Member
    Helix Alioth's Avatar
    August 2009
    2,566 Posts
    [release]
    Three scientists at UC San Diego have rigorously estimated the annual amount of business-related information processed by the world's computer servers in terms that Guttenberg and Galileo would have appreciated: the digital equivalent of a 5.6-billion-mile-high stack of books from Earth to Neptune and back to Earth, repeated about 20 times a year.


    The world's roughly 27 million computer servers processed 9.57 zettabytes of information in 2008, according to a paper to be presented April 7 at Storage Networking World's (SNW's) annual meeting in Santa Clara, Calif.

    The first-of-its kind rigorous estimate was generated with server-processing performance standards, server-industry reports, interviews with information technology experts, sales figures from server manufacturers and other sources. (One zettabyte is 10 to the 21st power, or a million million gigabytes.)

    The study estimated that enterprise server workloads are doubling about every two years, which means that by 2024 the world's enterprise servers will annually process the digital equivalent of a stack of books extending more than 4.37 light-years to Alpha Centauri, our closest neighboring star system in the Milky Way Galaxy. (Each book is assumed to be 4.8 centimeters thick and contain 2.5 megabytes of information.)

    "Most of this information is incredibly transient: it is created, used, and discarded in a few seconds without ever being seen by a person," said Roger Bohn, one of the report's co-authors and a professor of technology management at UC San Diego's School of International Relations and Pacific Studies. "It's the underwater base of the iceberg that runs the world that we see."

    The authors of the report titled "How Much Information: 2010 Report on Enterprise Server Information" are Bohn, James E. Short, a research scientist at UC San Diego's School of International Relations and Pacific Studies and research director of the HMI? project, and Chaitanya K. Baru, a distinguished scientist at the San Diego Supercomputer Center.

    The paper follows an earlier report on information consumption by U.S. households as part of The How Much Information? project. The effort is designed to conduct a census of the world's information in 2008 and onward, and is supported by AT&T, Cisco Systems, IBM, Intel, LSI, Oracle and Seagate Technology. Early support was provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

    "The exploding growth in stored collections of numbers, images and other data is well known, but mere data becomes more important when it is actively processed by servers as representing meaningful information delivered for an ever-increasing number of uses," said Short. "As the capacity of servers to process the digital universe's expanding base of information continues to increase, the development itself creates unprecedented challenges and opportunities for corporate information officers."

    The workload of all 27 million of the world's enterprise servers in use in 2008 was estimated by using cost and performance benchmarks for online transaction processing, Web services and virtual machine processing.

    "Of course, we couldn't directly measure the allocation of workload to millions of servers worldwide, but we received important guidance from experts, industry data and our own judgment," Short said. "Since our capacity assumptions, methodology and calculations are complex, we have prepared a separate technical paper as background to explain our methodology and provide sample calculations."

    Servers amount to the unseen, ubiquitous, humming computational infrastructure of modern economies. The study estimated that each of the 3.18 billion workers in the world's labor force received an average of 3 terabytes of information per year.

    Rather than focusing on raw processing power, the new analysis focused on server performance per dollar invested as a more consistent yardstick across a wide array of server types and sizes. "While midrange servers doubled their Web processing and business application workloads every 2 years, they doubled their performance per dollar every 1.5 years," Bohn said.

    The 36-page "How Much Information?" report said total worldwide sales of all servers has remained stable at about $50-$55 billion per year for five years ending in 2008, while new-server performance as measured by industry benchmarks went up five- to eight-fold during the same period. Entry-level servers costing less than $25,000 processed about 65 percent of the world's information in 2008, midrange servers processed 30 percent, and high-end servers costing $500,000 or more processed 5 percent of the world's information in 2008.

    The report's authors note that the estimated workload of the world's servers may be an underestimate because server-industry sales figures don't fully include the millions of servers built in-house from component parts by Google, Microsoft, Yahoo! and others.

    The study estimated a sharp increase in virtualization beginning in 2006, in which many distinct "virtual servers" can run on one physical server. Virtualization is a way to improve energy efficiency, scalability and overall performance of large-scale information processing. One of its uses is for cloud computing in which server-processing power is provided as a centrally administered commodity that business clients can pay for as needed.

    "Corporations and organizations that have huge and growing databases are compelled to rethink how they accomplish economies of scale, which is why many are now embracing cloud computing initiatives and green datacenters," said Baru. "In addition, a corporation's competitiveness will increasingly hinge on its ability to employ innovative search techniques that help users discover data and obtain useful results, and automatically offer recommendations for subsequent searches."

    Measuring worldwide flows of information is an inexact science, and the How Much Information project will issue additional analyses as improved metrics become available and accepted. In 2007, the International Data Corporation and EMC Corp. reported that the total digital universe of information created, captured or replicated digitally was 281 exabytes and would not reach 1 zettabyte until 2010. The study by Short, Bohn and Baru included estimates of the amount of data processed as input and delivered by servers as output. For example, one email message may flow through multiple servers and be counted multiple times.

    The How Much Information paper points to the importance of data archiving and digital-data preservation. "Preserving data is an increasingly important challenge for business organizations and arbitrary age limits make little sense," said Baru. "In the future, data archiving and preservation will require as much enthusiasm in research and industry settings as we have provided to data generation and data processing."
    [/release]
    Source
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  2. Post #2
    Gold Member
    Elstumpo's Avatar
    September 2008
    2,419 Posts
    Scientific research tells us this is a metric fuckton.
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  3. Post #3
    Gold Member
    HumanAbyss's Avatar
    March 2009
    17,301 Posts
    All that just for fapping?
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  4. Post #4
    Dennab
    August 2009
    1,072 Posts
    Hey cool, my school.
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  5. Post #5
    Gold Member
    krakadict's Avatar
    June 2009
    2,892 Posts
    they found my porn folder.
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  6. Post #6
    Gay for BDA
    angelangel's Avatar
    November 2005
    8,386 Posts
    they found my porn folder.
    aho ho ho hoho ho ho
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  7. Post #7
    Gold Member

    October 2008
    3,838 Posts
    Too much sex jokes in here.
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  8. Post #8

    July 2010
    535 Posts
    they found my porn folder.
    JOKER

  9. Post #9
    Hello Handsome
    Dennab
    February 2010
    13,495 Posts
    Scientific research tells us this is a metric fuckton.
    Amazing Atheist fan I see.

  10. Post #10
    Gold Member
    mankind_me's Avatar
    August 2007
    6,287 Posts
    That's more like 1,12982618 10^22 bytes
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  11. Post #11
    Gold Member
    Master117's Avatar
    October 2005
    3,047 Posts
    At one point in the future, home storage will be measured in this unit.
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  12. Post #12
    fskman's Avatar
    November 2009
    2,027 Posts
    At one point in the future, home storage will be measured in this unit.
    Just got my 4 zettabyte quantum state drive, u jelly?
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  13. Post #13
    LuckOrLoss's Avatar
    September 2008
    139 Posts
    Just got my 4 zettabyte quantum state drive, u jelly?
    I'm already using a yottabyte drive.
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  14. Post #14
    Gold Member
    Scot's Avatar
    March 2007
    15,051 Posts
    At one point in the future, home storage will be measured in this unit.
    No because nobody could ever use that much storage.
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  15. Post #15
    I WOTCH ANIEM
    Maximo13's Avatar
    October 2008
    8,027 Posts
    I'm already using a yottabyte drive.
    Isn't it iota?
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  16. Post #16
    Sirias's Avatar
    October 2007
    176 Posts
    No because nobody could ever use that much storage.
    They said that for gigabytes too!
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  17. Post #17
    Gold Member
    Im Crimson's Avatar
    December 2005
    6,048 Posts
    No because nobody could ever use that much storage.
    They once said that no personal computer would ever need more than 128 kilobytes of RAM.
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  18. Post #18
    Gold Member
    Maucer's Avatar
    August 2007
    2,310 Posts
    No because nobody could ever use that much storage.
    "640K is more memory than anyone will ever need"

    -Bill Gates
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  19. Post #19
    Gold Member
    Zezibesh's Avatar
    May 2008
    18,888 Posts
    "640K is more memory than anyone will ever need"

    -Bill Gates
    "We will never make a 32-bit operating system"

    -Bill Gates
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  20. Post #20
    Gold Member
    KorJax's Avatar
    January 2007
    11,525 Posts
    All that for just "business information"? What about home or recreational use?

    Unless by business inforomation they include home use too.

  21. Post #21
    BrQ
    Test victim #2
    BrQ's Avatar
    June 2008
    6,861 Posts
    "640K is more memory than anyone will ever need"

    -Bill Gates
    Just wait, soon we'll reach the 64 bit limit of around 16 exabytes
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  22. Post #22
    Somebody_404's Avatar
    January 2008
    1,307 Posts
    By posting this i'm using up more bytes.

    Another bite bytes the dust. ;)
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  23. Post #23
    c0nk3r's Avatar
    October 2009
    5,002 Posts
    My wallet is 10,000 hollabytes
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  24. Post #24
    Gold Member
    Master117's Avatar
    October 2005
    3,047 Posts
    When a Jedi eats food, do they take Yodabytes?
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  25. Post #25
    Proudly supporting the JIDF
    Dennab
    July 2010
    22,111 Posts
    No home computer will ever need a terabyte of memory.
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  26. Post #26
    RyanDv3's Avatar
    May 2008
    999 Posts
    They said that for gigabytes too!
    I think that may have been the joke

  27. Post #27
    Lust's Avatar
    August 2010
    676 Posts
    When a Jedi eats food, do they take Yodabytes?
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  28. Post #28
    What's brevity?
    ironman17's Avatar
    June 2006
    18,647 Posts
    Wow, that's a LOT of porn.
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  29. Post #29
    Gold Member
    Impulse101's Avatar
    January 2009
    1,436 Posts
    No because nobody could ever use that much storage.
    Ohohoho.
    I remember the time I thought my friend was stupid when he said he wanted to get a 1TB HDD, back then I thought nobody would need that much space so I got a 500GB HDD.

    Months later, 3GB left of free space in C: :argh:
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  30. Post #30
    Gold Member
    windwakr's Avatar
    September 2009
    4,597 Posts
    Remember, this is only business related stuff, not just overall. I wonder what the total would be.

  31. Post #31
    Captain Westcliff: Thinks Wales is an Island
    NeoDement's Avatar
    January 2006
    17,984 Posts
    wooow
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  32. Post #32
    Gold Member
    Lazor's Avatar
    July 2007
    9,254 Posts
    "640K is more memory than anyone will ever need"

    -Bill Gates
    he never actually said this
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  33. Post #33
    Gold Member
    esalaka's Avatar
    July 2007
    10,065 Posts
    he never actually said this
    Indeed. It was 64K and he meant something quite different.

    Also one does not simply consume information.

  34. Post #34
    "We should allow child labor overseas ...the sweatshop is what is saving the 9 year old worker"
    Pepin's Avatar
    April 2007
    6,864 Posts
    Why is the title describing bytes? It'd make more sense to use a commonly known unit like terabyte. You could of course use the best fit unit, but most people don't know beyond tera.
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  35. Post #35
    Garry doesn't deserve a penny of my money
    AzzyMaster's Avatar
    October 2008
    1,162 Posts
    Why is the title describing bytes? It'd make more sense to use a commonly known unit like terabyte. You could of course use the best fit unit, but most people don't know beyond tera.
    To make it look bigger.
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  36. Post #36
    To make it look bigger.
    For simple minded people to think "WOAH THAT'S A BIG NUMBER", in order to increase the WOAH factor of this article.

  37. Post #37
    "We should allow child labor overseas ...the sweatshop is what is saving the 9 year old worker"
    Pepin's Avatar
    April 2007
    6,864 Posts
    I think 9,570,000,000 terabytes looks larger than 9,570,000,000,000,000,000,000 bytes because terabyte is more relatable. Most people know that a byte is small and even a large number of bytes don't really add up to a lot of space. We all know how much data we could fit into a terabyte, but most people really don't have that great of a grasp on bytes. A large string with the unit of byte doesn't mean as much as a long string with a unit that means something. Maybe I'm taking this discussion into another direction, so I'll stop.
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  38. Post #38
    churboi austin
    Trogdon's Avatar
    October 2007
    12,793 Posts
    man this bytes!
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  39. Post #39
    Gold Member
    dude2193's Avatar
    April 2006
    2,668 Posts
    man this bytes!
    just like that last pun

  40. Post #40
    I wasted a dollar on a stupid title.
    nikomo's Avatar
    September 2007
    16,641 Posts
    That's like, what, somewhere around 8500 terabytes?
    Can't be arsed to find a calculator.
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