1. Post #1
    Gold Member
    Mr.T's Avatar
    August 2010
    2,691 Posts
    "This is a new phenomenon we're observing, exclusively at the nanoscale, and it is completely contrary to our intuition and knowledge of Joule heating at larger scales-for example, in things like your toaster," says first author Kamal Baloch, who conducted the research while a graduate student at the University of Maryland. "The nanotube's electrons are bouncing off of something, but not its atoms. Somehow, the atoms of the neighboring materials-the silicon nitride substrate-are vibrating and getting hot instead."
    "The effect is a little bit weird," admits John Cumings, an assistant professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering who oversaw the research project. He and Baloch have dubbed the phenomenon "remote Joule heating."
    An Unreal Discovery
    For the UMD researchers, the experience of the discovery was like what you or I might have felt, if, on a seemingly ordinary morning, we began to make breakfast, only to find certain things happening that seem to violate normal reality. The toast is burned, but the toaster is cold. The switch on the stove is set to "HI" and the teapot is whistling, but the burner isn't hot.
    Of course, Baloch, Cumings and their colleagus weren't making breakfast in a kitchen, but running experiments in an electron microscopy facility at the A. James Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland. They ran their experiments over and over, and the result was always the same: when they passed an electrical current through a carbon nanotube, the substrate below it grew hot enough to melt metal nanoparticles on its surface, but the nanotube itself seemed to stay cool, and so did the metal contacts attached to it.
    For us non-scientists, their experience might not seem so strange at first glance-after all, food cooked in a microwave oven gets hot while the oven itself stays close to room temperature. The problem is that Baloch and Cumings weren't intentionally generating a microwave field. They were only passing a direct electrical current through the nanotube, which should have caused it to heat up. The data were telling them a story that didn't seem to make any sense-one about a plugged-in toaster that could burn bread without getting hot.
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    A phenomenon known as "Joule heating" dictates that an electrical current will cause travelling electrons to bounce off the atoms of a metal wire, making them vibrate in place. These vibrations create heat, and any conducting wire should show the effect, including the heating elements of toasters, hair dryers, and electric stovetops. Carbon nanotubes are known to conduct electricity like nanoscale metallic wires, so Baloch and Cumings expected to see the same effect when they passed current through a carbon nanotube.
    They used a technique developed in Cumings's lab called electron thermal microscopy, which maps where heat is generated in nanoscale electrical devices, to observe the effect of the current on a nanotube. They expected to see heat traveling along the length of the nanotube to metal contacts attached to it. Instead, the heat seemed to jump directly to the silicon nitride substrate beneath, heating it up while leaving the nanotube relatively cold.
    But how is it even possible for the nanotube's electrons to vibrate the substrate's atoms if they're separated by distance, even one measuring in nanometers? Baloch and Cumings speculate a "third party" is involved: electrical fields.
    "We believe that the nanotube's electrons are creating electrical fields due to the current, and the substrate's atoms are directly responding to those fields," Cumings explains. "The transfer of energy is taking place through these intermediaries, and not because the nanotube's electrons are bouncing off of the substrate's atoms. While there is some analogy to a microwave oven, the physics behind the two phenomena is actually very different."
    Baloch adds that the remote Joule heating effect could have far reaching implications for computing technology. "What currently limits the performance of a computer's processor is the speed at which it can run, and what limits the speed is the fact that it gets too hot," he explains. "If you could find some way of getting rid of the waste heat more effectively, then it could run faster. A transistor that doesn't dissipate energy within itself as heat, like the nanotubes in our experiment, could be a game-changer. This new mechanism of thermal transport would allow you to engineer your thermal conductor and electrical conductor separately, choosing the best properties for each without requiring the two to be the same material occupying the same region of space."
    For the moment, an air of mystery still surrounds the phenomenon, which has been observed only at the nanoscale, and only in carbon materials. The next steps are to determine if other materials can produce the effect, and if so, what properties they must have. "We now know that silicon nitride can absorb energy from a current-carrying nanotube in this way, but we would like to test other materials, such as semiconductors and other insulators," Cumings explains. "If we can really understand how this phenomenon works, we could start engineering a new generation of nanoelectronics with integrated thermal management."
    This discovery was published in the April 8th advance online issue of Nature Nanotechnology. The research was supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences.
    SCIENCE!
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  2. Post #2
    Gold Member
    Raidyr's Avatar
    February 2007
    22,705 Posts
    Title is a little crazy.
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  3. Post #3
    Resident Raccoon
    kaze4159's Avatar
    January 2008
    8,083 Posts
    Future overclocking contests won't be about keeping your CPU from overheating, it'll be about not letting the building catch on fire
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  4. Post #4
    I'M A SHAAARK!
    Lambeth's Avatar
    October 2009
    14,832 Posts
    Read the title in Mr. T's voice.


    (fool)
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  5. Post #5
    Gold Member
    Mr.T's Avatar
    August 2010
    2,691 Posts
    Sorry about the title but I couldn't find a better way to put it.
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  6. Post #6
    E1025's Avatar
    November 2007
    1,116 Posts
    Heat Effect
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  7. Post #7
    Pioneering new discovery that can revolutionize safety within many workplaces. Facepunch's reaction:

    "Can I upgrade my PC with it?"



    Edited:

    Either way we should spend way more on carbon nanotube research, it has infinite and incredibly useful applications.
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  8. Post #8
    That's a pretty amazing discovery.
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  9. Post #9
    "You should see my penis, it puts a wookie to shame. its like a fucking front tail."
    Dysgalt's Avatar
    January 2010
    2,356 Posts
    How do the nanotubes avoid heating up? Wouldn't they themselves have to generate some portion of heat, like induction coils or what not?
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  10. Post #10
    Marik Bentusi's Avatar
    June 2010
    5,918 Posts
    Carbon Nano Tubes can do anything. They're like nanobots in soft scifi.

    Seriously.

    (User was banned for this post ("Image macro - even if you link it" - Craptasket))
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  11. Post #11
    ISPYUDIE's Avatar
    March 2008
    464 Posts
    Goodbye wooden desks, and probably metal too unless you plan on wearing oven gloves.
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  12. Post #12
    Carbon nanotubes will be the next steel revolution.
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  13. Post #13
    Certified Catgirl Maid
    slayer20's Avatar
    January 2006
    8,743 Posts
    put everything in nanotubes
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  14. Post #14
    Gold Member
    Performula's Avatar
    April 2008
    1,492 Posts
    In other words Facepunch, you people will still be playing video games in the future.
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  15. Post #15
    I'm different!
    Doctor Zedacon's Avatar
    July 2006
    12,675 Posts
    Goodbye wooden desks, and probably metal too unless you plan on wearing oven gloves.
    Carbon Nanotube desks.

    Edited:

    In other words Facepunch, you people will still be playing video games in the future.
    You expected different?
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  16. Post #16
    Ryuken's Avatar
    July 2010
    2,461 Posts
    welcome

    to the future
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  17. Post #17
    Marik Bentusi's Avatar
    June 2010
    5,918 Posts
    I just talked to a friend about it and after some additional explanation he came to the conclusion Carbon Nanotubes are the Mary Sue of materials.
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  18. Post #18
    I just talked to a friend about it and after some additional explanation he came to the conclusion Carbon Nanotubes are the Mary Sue of materials.
    There are literally no negative sides to it. It's not heavy, it's flexible, cheap, impossibly strong and more.
    If only we were able to make long strands, and start mass production we'd be set for a safer, better and cheaper future with an elevated standard of living.
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  19. Post #19
    I do it all
    fruxodaily's Avatar
    November 2010
    12,287 Posts
    Love a good descriptive title!
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  20. Post #20
    supertribute's Avatar
    March 2012
    1,701 Posts
    Maybe I suggest a new title: If mods want to change the title (IF YOU WANT, NOT THAT YOU HAVE TOO): Scientists have discovered electric current that's run through nanotubes

    Too short did read.
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  21. Post #21
    I'm different!
    Doctor Zedacon's Avatar
    July 2006
    12,675 Posts
    Scientists have discovered electric current that's run through nanotubes

    New title change for you. too short did read.
    Even though that is hardly an accurate thread title.
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  22. Post #22
    GAYLORD
    Wikipedia Vandilisation Contest Winner
    joe588's Avatar
    June 2005
    14,276 Posts
    Scientists have discovered electric current that's run through nanotubes
    what

    Edited:

    ban for cliffhanger thread title suggestion
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  23. Post #23
    supertribute's Avatar
    March 2012
    1,701 Posts
    what

    Edited:

    ban for cliffhanger thread title suggestion
    I'm pretty sure it was a normal suggestion, not a troll attempt.

    But yeah, not even sure no one will gonna read the Op's wall of text.
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  24. Post #24
    GAYLORD
    Wikipedia Vandilisation Contest Winner
    joe588's Avatar
    June 2005
    14,276 Posts
    yes i was joking you tit.

    however, that's hardly a thread title that could be used, you just lopped the end off so it doesn't make sense.
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  25. Post #25
    supertribute's Avatar
    March 2012
    1,701 Posts
    Thanks anyway. You can go back to your science, kids.
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  26. Post #26
    Pioneering new discovery that can revolutionize safety within many workplaces. Facepunch's reaction:

    "Can I upgrade my PC with it?"



    Edited:

    Either way we should spend way more on carbon nanotube research, it has infinite and incredibly useful applications.
    Well, yeah, most if not all of us play videogames on our free time and have built our PCs or at least added parts to them. That's the first thing I always think about when some temperature-related science article pops up. "Can I use this to replace my noisy cooler fan and heatsink?"
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  27. Post #27
    Gold Member
    Intoxicated Spy's Avatar
    September 2009
    5,958 Posts
    Can I get a source?
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  28. Post #28
    Gold Member
    Madman_Andre's Avatar
    November 2007
    7,239 Posts
    Future overclocking contests won't be about keeping your CPU from overheating, it'll be about not letting the building catch on fire
    Or your heatsink initiating nuclear fusion.
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  29. Post #29

    September 2010
    457 Posts
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  30. Post #30
    LegndNikko's Avatar
    October 2009
    8,339 Posts
    -SNIP, I'M FUCKING DUMB-
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  31. Post #31
    RISC MASTER RACE.
    MIPS's Avatar
    August 2010
    7,077 Posts
    Don't we call this Induction?
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  32. Post #32
    Gold Member
    Vaught's Avatar
    June 2008
    6,145 Posts
    Science should go faster, I want it now :c
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  33. Post #33
    Gold Member
    squids_eye's Avatar
    July 2006
    5,434 Posts
    I've gotten to the point where I'm not at all surprised by what carbon nano tubes can do, I just assume they can do literally anything.
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  34. Post #34
    milktree's Avatar
    January 2008
    1,128 Posts
    convert it to nanotubes
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  35. Post #35
    I'm different!
    Doctor Zedacon's Avatar
    July 2006
    12,675 Posts
    convert it to nanotubes
    What, is that the new "Convert to Communism" meme?
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  36. Post #36
    sephrosasia's Avatar
    July 2009
    214 Posts
    There are literally no negative sides to it. It's not heavy, it's flexible, cheap, impossibly strong and more.
    If only we were able to make long strands, and start mass production we'd be set for a safer, better and cheaper future with an elevated standard of living.
    Well there is one negative, they do have a health risk where they can cause damage to your lungs or possibly even cancer, in a similar way to asbestos.
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  37. Post #37
    Gold Member
    Psychokitten's Avatar
    July 2009
    11,610 Posts
    I've gotten to the point where I'm not at all surprised by what carbon nano tubes can do, I just assume they can do literally anything.
    So they're like Old Spice?
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  38. Post #38
    Gold Member
    BrainDeath's Avatar
    April 2007
    4,006 Posts
    Don't we call this Induction?
    They were passing a direct current though - it wasn't alternating.
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  39. Post #39
    Gold Member
    DesolateGrun's Avatar
    July 2008
    6,178 Posts
    CALL NIVIDA
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  40. Post #40
    Gold Member
    its shortie's Avatar
    August 2008
    2,996 Posts
    So...much....science.... I think I came a little bit.
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