1. Post #201
    www.bff-hab.de
    Dennab
    February 2009
    7,832 Posts
    True.

    I still hope that someday you will solder it all onto a perfboard and give it a nice and finished look
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  2. Post #202
    Gold Member
    Lapsus's Avatar
    June 2006
    1,076 Posts
    Unless you want to piss about with a TCP stack if your going down your best off just getting a sheild or getting a chip to handle it for you EG (ENC28J60-I/SP)

    Well, ideally I'd like to install ser2net on the router, as that'll handle all the TCP stuff so I can just port my little processing webserver over to the arduino, but I haven't the slightest idea on how to compile it, for the router or otherwise, as I'm utterly clueless when it comes to a distribution of linux that isn't ubuntu (and even then I can't figure out how to compile things! ).

    I know an ethernet shield is the easiest way to do it, but there's no way I can even begin to afford one.

    Edited:

    True.

    I still hope that someday you will solder it all onto a perfboard and give it a nice and finished look
    Well, ideally I'd like to eventually turn this into something larger, like the Adafruit SpokePOV, but that's likely a ways off for the moment.
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  3. Post #203
    Gold Member
    Chryseus's Avatar
    February 2009
    2,432 Posts


    A quick block diagram of my power supply I'm working on.
    Derp forgot to add voltage feedback wires.
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  4. Post #204
    HeatPipe's Avatar
    October 2007
    1,574 Posts
    A Netduino is probably the best option if you want an Arduino-like development board that you don't have to program in C/C++ or spend a long time setting up a toolchain for an unsupported language.
    Also, despite the fact that the Netduino's CPU is also made by Atmel, it uses the 32-bit ARM architecture rather than 8-bit AVR like on the Arduino.
    There's a list of other alternatives at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arduino#Non-ATmega_boards.
    Is there any particular reason why you don't want to use C/C++?
    C# is becoming widely used among industry there, but heck, I ordered Arduino anyway, I can't go wrong can I? I am still gonna use C# in Visual Studio, tomorrow will be experimenting day.
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  5. Post #205

    January 2007
    46 Posts
    C# is becoming widely used among industry there, but heck, I ordered Arduino anyway, I can't go wrong can I? I am still gonna use C# in Visual Studio, tomorrow will be experimenting day.
    Maybe I misunderstood you, but you can't program an Arduino using C# and Visual Studio. If you want to use a decent IDE to write code for your Arduino you can use Eclipse, there's a guide for setting it up at http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Code/Eclipse
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  6. Post #206
    Gold Member

    March 2005
    3,028 Posts
    Maybe I misunderstood you, but you can't program an Arduino using C# and Visual Studio. If you want to use a decent IDE to write code for your Arduino you can use Eclipse, there's a guide for setting it up at http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Code/Eclipse
    I honestly can't see any reason you would ever need (or even want) a beefy IDE like Eclipse to do Arduino stuff. You have, what, like 16kB code space? Somehow I don't think your projects are ever going to be so big you need all those features.
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  7. Post #207

    January 2007
    46 Posts
    I honestly can't see any reason you would ever need (or even want) a beefy IDE like Eclipse to do Arduino stuff. You have, what, like 16kB code space? Somehow I don't think your projects are ever going to be so big you need all those features.
    The code search and navigation features are quite useful, especially for working with libraries. You also have version control integration, call tips, better control of build settings, all of which are lacking in the Arduino IDE.
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  8. Post #208
    www.bff-hab.de
    Dennab
    February 2009
    7,832 Posts
    - snip wrong thread -
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  9. Post #209
    Gold Member
    Elspin's Avatar
    December 2006
    5,352 Posts
    Maybe I misunderstood you, but you can't program an Arduino using C# and Visual Studio. If you want to use a decent IDE to write code for your Arduino you can use Eclipse, there's a guide for setting it up at http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Code/Eclipse
    Uhhhh.... no you can't use C#, but of course you can use visual studios
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  10. Post #210
    www.bff-hab.de
    Dennab
    February 2009
    7,832 Posts
    Or use a Netduino if you really want to use C#
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  11. Post #211
    BMCHa's Avatar
    August 2007
    853 Posts
    Maybe I misunderstood you, but you can't program an Arduino using C# and Visual Studio. If you want to use a decent IDE to write code for your Arduino you can use Eclipse, there's a guide for setting it up at http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Code/Eclipse
    Though his post is a little hard to understand, I think he's saying that he was responding to "Is there any particular reason why you don't want to use C/C++?" and was originally considering a netduino because he wanted to use C#, but eventually decided to jump into C/C++ with an Arduino as he can learn C# with PC applications in Visual Studio.
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  12. Post #212
    HeatPipe's Avatar
    October 2007
    1,574 Posts
    Yup. I have now decided to make Kapagen generator.
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  13. Post #213
    Hearts
    Agent766's Avatar
    July 2007
    3,179 Posts
    http://appleton.craigslist.org/tls/2506765896.html
    Anyone interested? I can see how much it is to ship if need be.
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  14. Post #214
    Aw_Hell's Avatar
    July 2009
    1,158 Posts
    Anybody know where I could find a 30 watt audio amp with a supply voltage of ~12 volts (for a car)? That or I could figure out how to up the voltage (wouldn't be hard either).
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  15. Post #215
    quincy18's Avatar
    September 2007
    1,005 Posts
    I just found out that I have 2 bi-polar stepper motors lying around, now I looked up on how to control them with the arduino and every example I see is using this : http://datasheet.octopart.com/SN7544...heet-43537.pdf

    is there any way to control a bipolar stepper motor without using a ic ? as in discrete components only ?
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  16. Post #216
    Gold Member
    Chryseus's Avatar
    February 2009
    2,432 Posts
    I just found out that I have 2 bi-polar stepper motors lying around, now I looked up on how to control them with the arduino and every example I see is using this : http://datasheet.octopart.com/SN7544...heet-43537.pdf

    is there any way to control a bipolar stepper motor without using a ic ? as in discrete components only ?
    Yes, use transistors.
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  17. Post #217
    quincy18's Avatar
    September 2007
    1,005 Posts
    Yes, use transistors.
    Could you point me in the right direction ? As in circuits / tutorials etc.
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  18. Post #218
    quincy18's Avatar
    September 2007
    1,005 Posts
    Just looked into this and it seems like I just need to make 2 h-bridge circuits right (per motor)? and then I can write my own library to control this thing

    what happend to automerge :O ?
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  19. Post #219
    Gold Member
    Falcqn's Avatar
    July 2010
    3,015 Posts
    Just looked into this and it seems like I just need to make 2 h-bridge circuits right (per motor)? and then I can write my own library to control this thing

    what happend to automerge :O ?
    Posts don't merge if they're an hour or more apart.
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  20. Post #220
    chipset's Avatar
    November 2010
    2,262 Posts
    This probably belongs in H&S tech support but this is a thread full of people likely to know the answer so I might as well post here.

    There's been a lot of thunderstorms and lightning around here all summer. Some time ago I bought this pretty cheap APC surge protector and while the product page does say it protects against lightning, i wonder just how well? (full specs in the link) It was pretty cheap afterall and if it's no good, how much money do I need to spend to be protected from lighning strikes?
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  21. Post #221
    Gold Member
    Xera's Avatar
    November 2006
    3,097 Posts
    This probably belongs in H&S tech support but this is a thread full of people likely to know the answer so I might as well post here.

    There's been a lot of thunderstorms and lightning around here all summer. Some time ago I bought this pretty cheap APC surge protector and while the product page does say it protects against lightning, i wonder just how well? (full specs in the link) It was pretty cheap afterall and if it's no good, how much money do I need to spend to be protected from lighning strikes?
    Equipment protection policy
    Lifetime : 50000 Euros

    If it doesn't work, it looks like they will replace anything connected to it up to €50k. Which means it is probably going to work.
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  22. Post #222
    chipset's Avatar
    November 2010
    2,262 Posts
    Equipment protection policy
    Lifetime : 50000 Euros

    If it doesn't work, it looks like they will replace anything connected to it up to €50k. Which means it is probably going to work.
    Yes but is the protection enough for lightning? If it's only specified to cover normal power surges then that 50k euro ensurance means nothing in the event of lightning.
    The product specifications say:

    Pretty vaguely worded, doesn't say anything specifically about protecting about lightning.
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  23. Post #223
    Hearts
    Agent766's Avatar
    July 2007
    3,179 Posts
    It's under "Features" so I would assume it is. Call them or something.
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  24. Post #224
    chipset's Avatar
    November 2010
    2,262 Posts
    I was hoping someone would have a look at the technical specifications and say to which degree it would protect from lightning.
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  25. Post #225
    www.bff-hab.de
    Dennab
    February 2009
    7,832 Posts
    I got all kinds of Sparkfun-Electronics for documentation and writing AVR code (I didn't get it from Sparkfun)
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  26. Post #226
    Gold Member
    Chryseus's Avatar
    February 2009
    2,432 Posts
    Surge protectors will all survive lightning to a certain degree, this is usually given by the surge energy rating and the peak current, which in the one you have shown is 960 joules and 13kA also surge protectors have a let through voltage rating, which means a spike below this rating will be let though into the protected device.

    The one you have showed is not a particularly good surge protector, the peak current is fairly low and the let through voltage rating is ridiculous, a 800V spike could easily get though.
    However in my opinion surge protectors are rather useless, unless you get power line strikes often there is usually no need for one, in addition most switch mode power supplies contain built in surge protection.
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  27. Post #227
    quincy18's Avatar
    September 2007
    1,005 Posts
    Success ! Made a H-bridge with
    2 pnp transistors
    2 npn transistors
    4 1N4001 diodes
    and 4 1k resistors.

    Pic (warning my mobile makes pictures with a resolution of 3000 * 2000 so I quoted it)
    Edited:

    Going to build a little work station tomorrow, found some left over mdf in the shed.

    What should a proper work station include other then the obvious soldering iron stand ? I was thinking about attaching some chloth pegs to it to hold circuits and such.
    Ideas anyone ?
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  28. Post #228
    www.bff-hab.de
    Dennab
    February 2009
    7,832 Posts
    Now make a MOSFET H-Bridge.
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  29. Post #229
    Gold Member
    Chryseus's Avatar
    February 2009
    2,432 Posts
    Now make a MOSFET H-Bridge.
    For what purpose should he use MOSFET's ?
    Choosing between a Bipolar or FET H-bridge isn't just a simple decision, it depends very much on what you intend to do with it, each has their advantages and disadvantages but I'll leave that to you to figure out.
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  30. Post #230
    www.bff-hab.de
    Dennab
    February 2009
    7,832 Posts
    For what purpose should he use MOSFET's ?
    Choosing between a Bipolar or FET H-bridge isn't just a simple decision, it depends very much on what you intend to do with it, each has their advantages and disadvantages but I'll leave that to you to figure out.
    Well, FETs obviously can control more current and also need less power to drive it. The only obvious downside for H-Bridge-usage would be that the gate voltage would have to be atleast the source-voltage, but that can easily be managed with a bipolar transistor controlling the gate.
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  31. Post #231
    Gold Member
    Chryseus's Avatar
    February 2009
    2,432 Posts
    Well, FETs obviously can control more current and also need less power to drive it. The only obvious downside for H-Bridge-usage would be that the gate voltage would have to be atleast the source-voltage, but that can easily be managed with a bipolar transistor controlling the gate.
    Sorry what ? you clearly don't understand how MOSFETs work, you're also forgetting that MOSFETs have a much higher capacitance and drain-source on impedance compared with BJTs all of which needs to be taken into consideration when designing anything using transistors.
    You can't just arbitrarily pick parts when it comes to designing things, doing so is asking for trouble particularly when it comes to analog circuits.
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  32. Post #232
    bobiniki's Avatar
    December 2009
    423 Posts
    I have arduino too so add me on the list.
    bobiniki - Arduino Duemilanove, Arduino Duemilanove and Arduino Serial v2.0
    All 3 are with ATmega328 chip
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  33. Post #233
    Gold Member
    Chryseus's Avatar
    February 2009
    2,432 Posts
    I have arduino too so add me on the list.
    Done.
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  34. Post #234
    bobiniki's Avatar
    December 2009
    423 Posts
    Thx.
    I'll later or tomorow post a big post with pictures with the project im working on.But for now ill only say that i'm doing a people counter with arduino and 2 lazers that count people going in or out and how manny people are in a room.
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  35. Post #235
    Gold Member
    viperfan7's Avatar
    November 2007
    3,703 Posts
    worked with the boe-bot in school, need to buy me one, I had built myself a fleet of bots, hey, no one else was going to use them, also, which would you sugest, the serial or USB one, wondering because I can use the serial port to communicate between bots, and not sure if I can with the USB one
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  36. Post #236
    www.bff-hab.de
    Dennab
    February 2009
    7,832 Posts
    Won't the usb-version just have an FTDI chip on it to interface USB with serial?
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  37. Post #237
    Gold Member
    Chryseus's Avatar
    February 2009
    2,432 Posts
    Won't the usb-version just have an FTDI chip on it to interface USB with serial?
    Why does everyone keep talking about the FTDI RS232 chip, there are plenty of other USB-UART chips out there that do a better job and are cheaper.

    viperfan7 posted:
    not sure if I can with the USB one
    You should be able to, however ultimately it will depend upon the software and the chip used to provide the USB interface.
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  38. Post #238
    SubbyV-2's Avatar
    January 2011
    273 Posts
    Why does everyone keep talking about the FTDI RS232 chip, there are plenty of other USB-UART chips out there that do a better job and are cheaper.



    You should be able to, however ultimately it will depend upon the software and the chip used to provide the USB interface.
    Because the arduino made it a rather popular commonly known chip?
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  39. Post #239
    Gold Member

    March 2005
    3,028 Posts
    Why does everyone keep talking about the FTDI RS232 chip, there are plenty of other USB-UART chips out there that do a better job and are cheaper.
    Availability is an important quality. Is it really worth it to save a nickel on your BoM by choosing the cheaper (and probably more obscure) part when it's not guaranteed to be around in another year or so? At the very least, the popularity of the FTDI devices ensures they'll have a pretty long run.

    Nickels add up when you're making thousands of units, but for the hobbyist you'd rather have a design that's going to last a while.
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  40. Post #240
    Gold Member
    Little Green's Avatar
    March 2006
    188 Posts
    Finished hacking up a broken(ish) old Dell psu to use a desktop supply. Working nicely at the moment, hopefully it won't fail miserably under larger loads... Here it is hooked up to an atmega32 which I also just got working with a usbtinyISP.

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